Recently in Yard History Category

Benjamin Banneker: Invented America's First Clock

Webmin
1 Comment
benjamin-banneker.jpg
In the Stevie Wonder song "Black Man," the Motown marvel sings of Benjamin Banneker: "first clock to be made in America was created by a black man." The song touches on the genius of Benjamin Banneker and the many hats he wore - as a farmer, mathematician, astronomer, author and land surveyor.

Benjamin Banneker was the son of former slaves and was primarily self-taught. He received his early education from a Quaker school. He worked on his family's tobacco farm and at the age of 15 he took over the farm and invented an irrigation system to control the flow of water to the crops from nearby springs. As a result of his innovation, the farm flourished, even during droughts.

However, it was his clock invention that really propelled his reputation. Sometime in the early 1750s, Benjamin borrowed a pocket watch from a wealthy acquaintance, took the watch apart and studied its components. After returning the watch, he created a fully functioning clock entirely out of carved wooden pieces. The clock was amazingly precise, and would keep on ticking for decades. As the result of the attention his self-made clock received, Banneker was able to start up his own watch and clock repair business.

Banneker's accomplishments didn't end there.  He borrowed books on astronomy and mathematics from a friend and engorged himself in the subjects. Putting his newfound knowledge to use, Banneker accurately predicted a 1789 solar eclipse. In the early 1790s, Banneker added another job title to his resume - author. Wielding knowledge like a sword, Benjamin Banneker was many things - inventor, scientist, anti-slavery proponent - and, as a result, his legacy lives on to this day.




bob-marley-concert.jpg

The Life of legendary Reggae Icon Bob Marley was celebrated on February 5th at the Emancipation Park in New Kingston. The event titled "Celebrate the Life of a Legend" saw Rita Marley proudly sitting in the front row and watched with excitement as artistes delivered tributes to Bob.

The show was organized by telecoms group Digicel and the Bob Marley Foundation. The crowd was treated to performances from Judy Mowatt, Cocoa Tea, Alaine, I Octane, Freddie McGregor and Ky-Mani Marley.

Judy Mowatt gave a powerful performance and her I-Three member Rita Marley thoroughly enjoyed every minuet of it. Cocoa Tea was also a master performer and had the crowd begging for more. Cocoa Tea made way for I Octane who delivered hits such as "Burn Dem Bridge", "My Life" and "Lose a Friend". 

Other winning performances came from Protégé, Jermaine Edwards and Delando Colley., Senior Sponsorship Manager at Digicel, Shelly-Ann Curran, expressed satisfaction at the huge turnout. She stated that this was Digicel's second partnership with the Bob Marley Foundation and that Bob Marley has paved the way for many others.




Bob Marley interview 1979

Webmin
No Comments




Tifa and Popcaan win big at YVA's

Webmin
No Comments
tifa-and-popcaan.jpg

The fifth staging of the Youth View Awards show took place at the National Indoor Sports Centre on Saturday night. Celebs walked the Red Carpet and then went inside to hear the list of winners.

Dancehall artiste Tifa was the big winner of the night. Tifa was nominated in 8 categories and walked away with 6 awards. Among the awards were: Best Female Artiste, Best Music Video (a collaboration with Wayne Marshall and Fambo), Young,Hot and Hype female of the Year, Favorite Female Dancehall artiste, Female Fashion Icon and Favorite Collaboration for the song 'Swaggin' WTF' with Wayne Marshall and Fambo.

Popcaan was also a big winner as he walked away with 3 awards: Young, Hot and Hype Male of the Year, Best Summer Song for 'Raving' and Local Chart Topping song of the Year for 'Raving'. The event was hosted by Tami Chynn and Kruddy and the audience was treated to performances from: I Octane, Chris Martin, Tifa, Wayne Marshall, Fambo and Ikaya who did a superb tribute to Bob Marley.




Bob Marley: The Legend Lives On

Webmin
1 Comment
bob-marley.jpg
Bob Marley was born on Feb 6th, 1945, in St. Ann. His mom at the time was an 18 year old Jamaican native, and his dad was a 50 year old white navel captain. The couple got married in 1944 a year before Bob was born. In 1950 Marley moved to Trench Town - Kingston. After Marley dropped out of school he became interested in music. In early 1962 Bob Marley, Bunny Livingston, Peter McIntosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso and Cherry Smith formed a ska & rocksteady group called "The Teenager" which later became The Wailing Rudeboys it was changed again to The Wailing Wailers and eventually became The Wailers . 

Bob Marley has been a great influence in the lives of many present day musical artists and other performers. He grew up listening to the legendary Fats Domino, Ray Charles, Curtis Mayfield, the Drifters and Louis Jordan. 

Bob Marley would put his first record out on wax in February of 1962, the song was called "Judge not." When it came out it was an instant hit locally, but his international fame would not spread for a couple of years.

In 1969, the Wailers first tape was recorded, they were sent to England and released on Trojan records, it was Bob Marley and the Wailers first album and was titled 'Soul Rebels'. This album was only released in Jamaica and England and sold well. titled 'Exodus'

In 1976 'Rastaman Vibrations' was released and the album made its way on to  the American charts.  In December of 1976, an Assassination attempt took place at his house and Marley was shot. Another album was released and stayed on the European charts for 56 weeks.

In May of 1977 during the Exodus tour he was playing football and injured his toe. The injury never healed, and he never got it treated and continued on his tour. 

Marley's last concert would be in Pittsburgh on Sept. 23, 1980 at the Stanley Theater. He would undergo many different treatments to keep him alive longer, but on May 11th, 1981, Bob Marley died at the age of 36 from cancer. 

Although Bob has been dead for years, his music lives on through his sons: Stephen, Ziggy, Julian and Kymani.  Bob Marley not only was one of the greatest musicians in the history of music, he is also one of the greatest men in the history of the world, through his music he not only touched the lives of his fellow countrymen and he has influenced the lifestyles, attitudes and feelings of people all over the world.





BLACK HISTORY MONTH Feature: Nanny of the Maroons

Webmin
No Comments
nanny-of-the-maroons.jpg
Nanny, also called Nanny of the Maroons and Queen Nanny, was a leader of the Maroons in Jamaica. The Maroons were considered defiant Jamaican slaves who fled from the oppressive plantations and formed their own community in the hills. Nanny and her brothers: Accompong, Cudjoe, Johhny and Quao ran away from their plantation and lived in the Blue Mountain areas.

By 1720, Nanny and Quao had settled and controlled an area in the Blue Mountains. As a revolt leader, Nanny aided in the defeat of the British army in several battles. Nanny organized plans to free slaves and was very successful in doing this. Over a 5o year span, Nanny has been credited with freeing over 800 slaves. She also kept the slaves healthy due to her vast knowledge of herbs and her role as a spiritual leader.

The community in which Nanny settled was given the name Nanny Town and consisted of 500 acres of land granted to the runaway slaves. Nanny is one of the earliest leaders of slave resistance and one of the very few women.

The government of Jamaica declared Nanny a National Heroine in 1976. Her portrait graces the $500 Jamaican dollar bill.




Dennis Brown tribute to start Reggae Month

Webmin
No Comments
dennis-brown.jpg
Reggae Month kicks off next month, and with Jamaica celebrating 50 years, plans are well underway for this year's staging.

The Jamaica Reggae Industry Association (JaRIA) has met with Damian Crawford, Minister of State in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment and Lisa Hannah, Minister of Youth and Culture. Crawford assured JaRIA that the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) would be partnering with them to stage Reggae Month with a sponsorship of $4million. 

Under the theme Reggae 50 ... Jamaica's Heart and Soul, Reggae Month will kick off with the staging of the Dennis Brown Tribute Concert which will feature artistes such as Damian and Stephen Marley, Tarrus Riley, Cocoa Tea, Half Pint, Ken Boothe, Junior Reid and Beres Hammond. The event will take place on January 29 at Orange Street, Down Town.

JaRIA's signature event will be "Reggae Nights" WHICH WILL OPEN February 1st at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. This will be a celebration of musical heritage through classical, jazz, mento and ska. Reggae Month was officially declared by Sir Kenneth Hall, then Governor General of Jamaica, on January 24, 2008. The full calendar for Reggae Month will be revealed at a press launch today at the Bob Marley Museum.




Irie FM celebrates Peter Tosh

Webmin
No Comments

Peter Tosh

In celebration of Reggae month IRIE FM will hit the road again to pay homage to the legendary Peter Tosh

On Feb 27 IRIE FM will have a special outside broadcast at the Peter Tosh Museum in Bluefield, Westmorland

The media house will celebrate Peter Tosh life, work and legacy from 6 AM to 2 PM with the Running African show with Andrea Williams and Sunday Sunshine with Big A.

The IRE FM's broadcast will feature nyabinghi drummers, live performances and much more.

Enhanced by Zemanta







Another year, another Black History Month. There are currently lectures, readings, and performances taking place throughout the country.

Quanae Palmer-Chambliss, 41, is a single Black mother and education paraprofessional. She is raising four boys on her own. Quanae says that she recently moved to a beautiful townhouse complex in Edison, New Jersey.

“Management is very strict about the people they rent apartments to,” she explains to me; but, something else is on her mind even though it is Black History Month.

Quanae is concerned about certain Black folks who destroy apartment buildings and neighborhoods, she says, with Promethean speed and demolition-like efficiency.

“I wonder if some of their bad habits are attributable to a lack of Black leadership?,” she asked me.

“Black folks have had more great Black leaders than you can count. What more can Black leaders say to certain Black folks who simply just don’t get it?“ I responded.

Within the Black community, there are Black folks who simply have not absorbed the message of self-love, civility, and decency that is inherent in Black leadership narratives. Do Black folks bear any inverse responsibility to Black leaders who have emphasized social uplift and progress?

Even if Moses showed up in the ‘hood at midnight carrying a modified version of the Ten Commandments—these are tough times!—it is likely that young Black folks would refer to him on a first name basis as “Dog” or “Pop.”

About a few blocks into his mission—if the Black teenagers who have been killed and robbed by other Blacks for their Air Jordan sneakers, gold chains, and I-Pods are any indication—Black thugs might tell Moses to give up his Egyptian cotton robe, Barenia leather sandals, and 18-caret gold staff. And it is a strong possibility that he would be left butt naked standing on the sidewalk. Or Moses could be shot—possibly dead—and robbed.

Extreme?

Despite the gains some Blacks have made since the 1960s, there are also many other Blacks who are far from The Promised Land envisioned by many Black leaders.

Eugene Robinson, The Washington Post columnist, recently published a book called Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America. He argues that there are four distinct classes of Black-Americans: Mainstream, Abandoned, Transcendent, and Emergent.

I guess Quanae is alluding to Abandoned-class Blacks. Robinson defines this class as, “A large Abandoned minority with less hope of escaping poverty and dysfunction than at any time since Reconstruction’s crushing end.”

Quanae is fortunate. She could be living further south in Camden, New Jersey. It is one of the poorest cities in the nation.

While President Obama’s recent State of the Union Address highlighted American exceptionalism, he certainly did not address budget cuts well underway in many cities and states.

Camden recently laid-off 168 police officers, or 45 percent of its force, to close a budget gap. According to FBI crime data, Camden ranked second, only to St. Louis, as the most dangerous city in America in 2009.

As cities and states are compelled to close budget deficits, how are the abandoned, not to mention Black middle-class workers employed by the government, supposed to survive as cuts to government services and job layoffs continue unabated?

The U.S. government is staring in the face of potentially unimaginable social unrest. The turmoil we witness today in Cairo, Egypt could arrive on our doorsteps tomorrow, courtesy of the continued economic dislocation of millions of Americans.

Meanwhile, Black single working mothers like Quanae are forced to ask difficult questions about the vagaries of Black life at Ground Zero.

I told Quanae that to righteously respond to her question requires an understanding of what sociologists call “structural forces.” It also requires an inevitable “internal discussion” that Blacks must engage.

Meanwhile, Black intellectuals, scholars, and mental health professionals should consider establishing a national dialogue on Black civility.

This dialogue must address the violence, psychic alienation, distrust, and the disregard for Black life that plagues the Black
community.

Article written by Hakim Hasan






Black people you should know

Webmin
No Comments



AT A GLANCE:
The American Red Cross blood program of today is a direct result of the work of medical pioneer Dr. Charles Drew, beginning in 1940 and throughout World War II. Dr. Drew was instrumental in developing blood plasma processing, storage and transfusion therapy. His groundbreaking work in the large-scale production of human plasma was eventually used by the U.S. Army and the American Red Cross as the basis for blood banks.. THE STORY
RELATED INFO

Milestones:
1904 Charles Drew born on June 3, in Washington D.C.
1939 Drew married Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children
1940 Completes his doctoral thesis, titled "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".
1940 Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project.
1941 Drew was named director of the newly formed Red Cross Blood Bank .
1950 Drew died on April 1, in an auto accident while traveling to a medical convention
CAPS: Drew, Charles Drew, Charles Richard Drew, Dr. John Scudder, American Red Cross, ARY, blood bank, blood plasma, dried blood, blood transfusion, SIP, history, biography, inventor, invention, story, facts.
The Story:
Dr. Charles Richard Drew was the first person to develop the blood bank. His introduction of a system for the storing of blood plasma revolutionized the medical profession. Drew first utilized his system on the battlefields of Europe and the Pacific during World War II. He organized the world's first blood bank project in 1940 - Blood for Britain. He also established the American Red Cross Blood Bank, of which he was the first director.

Drew was born in Washington, D.C. June 3, 1904 to Richard and Nora Drew, and was the oldest of five children. In his youth he seemed headed for a career in athletics and the coaching field rather than for medicine, starring as a four letter man in Dunbar High School, Washington. He went on to study at Amherst College, where he was a star athlete, all-American half-back and captain of his Amherst College football team.

After graduation, Charles Drew was a coach and a biology and chemistry instructor at Morgan State College, Baltimore, Maryland. But a turning point in his life was at hand. It had become his ambition to enter the field of medicine. He resigned his job at Morgan State and went to Montreal, Canada, where he enrolled in McGill University's Medical School. There he was granted two fellowships and was awarded his doctorate of medicine and master of surgery degrees.

For two years following graduation, Dr. Drew was an intern and resident in Montreal hospitals. In 1935, he returned to the United States to accept an appointment as instructor in pathology at the College of Medicine of Howard University in Washington, D.C. During the next two years, he advanced to become assistant professor of surgery.

Dr. Drew showed such promise in his work at Howard University that in 1938, at a time when war clouds were gathering over Europe, he was recommended for one of the Rockefeller fellowships at Columbia aimed at promoting advanced training in all fields of medicine. It was through this fellow ship that he met Dr. John Scudder and began study under him.

Dr. Drew was married in 1939 to Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children, Bebe Roberta, Charlene Rosella, Rhea Sylvia, and Charles Richard, Jr. Shortly after, Dr. Drew earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from Columbia University in 1940, with a 200 page doctoral thesis under the title "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".

Drew received an urgent cablegram from a former teacher, who had returned to England. The cable requested 5,000 glass containers of dried plasma for transfusions, plus the same amount three weeks later. A large project was started in August 1940 to collect blood in New York City hospitals for the export of plasma to Britain. Dr. Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project. His notable contribution at this time was to transform the test tube methods of many blood researchers, including himself, into the first successful mass production techniques.

By this time it had become apparent that America probably would be drawn into the war. Military authorities in the United States were concerned with the need for a stockpile of blood reserves if hostilities should begin. Dr. Drew had emerged as a leading authority on mass transfusion and processing methods.

After discussions with medical leaders and the American Red Cross, the government asked the Red Cross to establish a pilot program similar to the Plasma for Britain Project but on a smaller scale. Charles Drew was named director of the Red Cross Blood Bank and assistant director of the National Research Council, in charge of blood collection for the United States Army and Navy. The pilot center was set up through the Red Cross chapter in New York City and began operation in February 1941.

In 1941, Dr. Drew returned to Howard University, where he gained new distinction, particularly in the training of young surgeons. He had spent a total of seven months in the two blood projects, yet in this very brief but productive period of his professional life, he made an outstanding contribution to what was to become a highly successful World War II blood procurement effort.

After Dr. Drew's return to Howard, he was appointed to several scientific committees and received honorary degrees from Virginia State and Amherst Colleges in 1945 and 1947. He was one of the first of his race to be selected for membership on the American Board of Surgery. He also received the Spingarn Medal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1944 for his outstanding contribution to human welfare.

The experience gained through Dr. Drew's efforts at the Red Cross New York center proved invaluable, and during World War II, 35 blood bank centers were in operation. By war's end, millions of donations had been received by the Red Cross, donations that made possible the saving of thousands of lives of wounded U.S. servicemen lives that would have been lost in earlier wars when blood therapy was unknown.

Mankind suffered a great loss in 1950 when, at the age of 45, Dr. Drew was killed in an automobile accident while driving to a scientific conference. His pioneering medical work has endured. How many lives have been saved because of his genius at turning basic biological research into practical production methods is impossible to determine. But it is a certainty that mankind owes a debt of gratitude to Charles Richard Drew.

BOOKS

WEB SITES

WHERE TO FIND

QUOTATIONS

HOW IT WORKS

DID YOU KNOW?

Inventor: Charles Richard Drew

Charles Drew photo courtesy Dr. Charles Drew, Medical Pioneer book cover

Criteria: First practical. Modern prototype.

Birth: June 3, 1904,in Washington, D.C.

Death: April 1, 1950 while traveling in rural North Carolina.

Nationality: American

Invention: Blood Bank

Blood drive photo courtesy American Red Cross

Function: noun / blood plasma

Definition: A place, usually a separate division of a hospital laboratory, in which blood is collected from donors, typed, and often separated into several components for future transfusion to recipients. The American Red Cross operates the largest blood bank in the U.S.





Let’s really celebrate Black History Month

Webmin
No Comments




By Rae ROQ

So February is Black History Month and we all know this, but how many of us take the time to think about it and actually celebrate in our own personal way?
Black History Month is more than a month created to remember great black people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Marcus Garvey, and Nelson Mandela. This is a month in which we can celebrate not only our freedom, but look towards a brighter future. African people have come from a lineage of bondage and progression. Our ancestors suffered more than we have, so it is only right to be grateful for everything that we have and are lucky to get.
From the Civil Rights movement, to black people breaking into the entertainment industry, dominating the sports scene, and America electing its first black president, we have shown that we are an evolving race capable of doing anything that we put our mind to. While chasing our own dreams it is only proper to pay homage to those who have paved the way.
There have been Jamaican artistes such as Grace Jones and Bob Marley who have created their own legacy. Many artistic concepts, such as photo shoot concepts used by present day super models like Amber Rose, have been revived from the portfolio book of Grace Jones. Bob Marley is still, and always will be, an international household name and icon. He will always be remembered for creating great music and trying to bring knowledge and positive vibes to the people.
Oprah Winfrey has made the Forbe's list year after year, but she is also well known for her generosity. She recently created her OWN network and has built a school for girls in Africa. Maya Angelou is one of the most inspirational writers to keep in mind when you want to put a pen to a pad and paint a picture with words.
Celebrate Black History Month this year by reading a great black book or watching a movie. Try researching a black person who has made great accomplishments online. You may be shocked to recognize that you may have something in common with them. Don’t let it pass you by this year.
Black is beautiful.





Top 9 Black Television Talk Show Hosts

Webmin
No Comments




You got questions? These nine television hosts probably had them too, for a wide array of celebrities, politicians, athletes, and everyday people with amazing stories. Check out our list of the nine best black television talk show hosts. 1. Oprah Winfrey Initially The Oprah Winfrey Show was just another talk show when it debuted in 1986. But what made it stand out and rise above the rest was the show’s host. Now The Oprah Winfrey Show is only a small part of Oprah’s empire, and in 2011, will cease to exist in its current format. But not because the show is cancelled, Oprah is moving onto something bigger than her own show. She’s starting her own network, appropriately called OWN.

2. Arsenio Hall The Arsenio Hall Show revolutionized late night television. Just ask Bill Clinton who many say would have never won the 1992 presidential election had it not been for his surprise appearance on that show.

3. Mo’Nique Unlike Arsenio, The Mo’Nique Show has a lot more competition in that late night slot. But the Oscar-winning comedienne has been able to hold her own against, pulling in her own unique audience on BET. While the rest of America was tuning into the drama of the late night talk show wars between Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno, plenty others tuned them out and tuned into Mo’Nique.

4. Tyra Banks A show about service as much as it was celebrity, through The Tyra Show, Tyra used her beauty and brains for good. What Oprah is to the stay-at-home moms of America, Tyra was to the teenagers of America who came home after school and needed a big sister to understand them.

5. Wendy Williams The popular radio DJ has successfully taken her format and gift of gossip to the small screen. Though Vh1 would air her radio show, The Wendy Williams Show has shown the queen of talk radio can also sit down on a couple of comfortable couch chairs and ask questions with the best of them.

6. Whoopi Goldberg The moderator of The View is fearless and isn’t afraid to call it like she sees it. And if someone else is calling it like she sees it on the show, she’s not afraid to retort or even walk away.

7. Montell Williams As a former Marine, and a victim to multiple scoliosis, Williams — an Emmy Award winning talk show host — used his show as a platform to bring awareness to various social issues in an aggressive style.

8. Star Jones The controversial panel member on The View during it’s early years was one of the sharpest and most entertaining women on the panel.

9. Tavis Smiley Many people were shocked when BET let Tavis Smiley’s contract as host of BET Tonight expire, but the charming media personality has landed on his feet. Now the host of his very own PBS show, Tavis Smiley, Smiley is doing what he does best, interviewing the people we’ve always wanted to talk to ourselves, asking them the questions we’ve always wanted to ask.








The Bob Marley Museum will on Friday, November 5 observe the 80th anniversary of the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I (The First) with a charity concert.

Fund raised will go towards the refurbishing of the Haile Selassie High.

"The school is in dire need of funds to assist with further development of the school, and it is with this in mind that the Friends of The Haile Selassie High School are doing their part in assisting in this project," said promoter Dr. Michael Barnett.

The concert line-up includes several well-known cultural reggae artistes such as Junior Reid with Andrew and Wada Blood, Determine, Warrior King, Andrew Tosh, Mikey General, Fred Locks, The Artist M, Herzon, The Uprising Roots Band, The Twelve Tribes of Israel and many more.

The show will also unveil a surprise vintage guest artiste.

The actual date of Haile Selassie’s coronation was November 2, 1930, but Dr. Barnett said the celebration was pushed back because of other events taking place on that day.





Jamaica a big winner at World Travel Awards

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica came out a big winner in the 2010 World Travel Awards, copping some 18 major awards in the travel and tourism categories.

At the gala ceremony held at the swanky Sandals Whitehouse European Village and Spa in Westmoreland on Friday (October 22), Jamaica took home honours for being Caribbean Leading Destination; Caribbean Leading Cruise Destination Excursion; Caribbean Leading Airport (Sangster International); Caribbean Leading Meeting and Conference Centre (Jamaica Conference Centre); Leading Hotel (Sandals Negril Beach Resort); Leading Resort (Sandals Whitehouse) and Leading Spa Resort (Half Moon, Montego Bay), among others.

Hundreds of representatives of the travel and tourism industry from the Caribbean, North, Central and South America attended the event, which is known as the Oscars of tourism.

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, who addressed the gathering, said that Jamaica was proud to be hosting the prestigious awards ceremony for the 17th year, which was testimony to the world class destination that the country had become.

He said that the accolades and recognition from the World Travel Awards, "speak to the excellence and service quality assurance that an international visitor can expect when selecting a destination or travel brand".

"It is well known that once a traveller sees the World Travel Awards symbol, they can be assured of the quality and they will know that they are getting the absolute best. It is a renowned badge of service excellence," he stated.

The Minister credited the achievement to the various stakeholders in the sector, noting that "it is the service quality and a visitor experience that epitomises excellence, which depicts a world class destination and resort. While Jamaica boasts the most diverse and largest number of attractions in the Caribbean, it is the warmth and tenacity of our people that create the winning experience."





Gregory Isaacs' body to be flown home November 11

Webmin
No Comments



The body of international reggae singer Gregory Isaacs will be flown to Jamaica on November 11.

The body will be escorted by his children and grand-children who reside in Britain.

His wife, Linda, who resides in the United Kingdom, says a memorial service will be held in London before the body is returned home.

The UK service is scheduled to held at 2pm on November 10 at the 'All Saints' Church in Harrow Weald, Isaac's London hometown.

Mrs. Isaacs reportedly told RJR News that Culture Minister, Olivia 'Babsy' Grange, has organised an official funeral to be held at the National Arena.

Gregory Isaacs died in London on Monday, October 25, after being diagnosed with lung cancer.





REGGAE MOURNS THE LOSS OF A LEGEND - GREGORY ISAACS

Webmin
5 Comments





Reggae Singer Passes Away in London from Lung Cancer
Gregory Isaacs
[July 15, 1951 - October 25, 2010]


October 25, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(VP RECORDS, NEW YORK) - The reggae community mourns the loss of one of its legends, Gregory Isaacs. Best known for his lovers' rock anthems, the versatile and velvet-voiced crooner was recognized by the international masses for his talent and contribution to music for decades, and remains an icon for the genre.

Isaacs was born on July 15, 1951 in Kingston, Jamaica andgained appeal and acclaim in the 1970s and 1980s for hits such as "Night Nurse" and "Rumors." Nicknamed the 'Cool Ruler' by his fans, Isaacs pioneered his own sound by fusing traditional reggae with dancehall, thereby reinventing the genre and expanding its global fan base into what it is today.

"Gregory Isaacs leaves behind an iconic history and catalog that is unparalleled," reveals VP Records CEO, Christopher Chin. "He devoted his entire life to music and his memory will forever live on with us - through his music and the legacy he leaves behind."

Isaacs fought a year-long battle with lung cancer before passing away on October 25, 2010 at his home in London, at the age of 59. Condolences and prayers go out to his family and loved ones during this trying time.

______________







Dancehall artistes Baby Cham and Bounty Killer who have not recorded together in almost a decade have reunited on a new single from producer Dave Kelly.


The new song is titled Stronger and also features Mykal Rose.
Stronger was released locally this week and is already spreading its wings on mainstream radio stations around the world.


Baby Cham, whose given name is Damian Beckett and Bounty Killer, whose real name is Rodney Price, were close friends in the 1990s but parted ways over unknown disagreements.


The two have reportedly worked out their differences and will also be working together to produce another mega hits like Another Level.
According to reports, Baby Cham is also an official member of the Bounty Killer-led Alliance.








Information released by the police show that the crime rate is trending down.

Between January 1 and September 30 this year, 1,065 murders were recorded, 135 fewer than to the same period last year. In 2008, the total recorded over the same period was 1,241.


The statistics show a 42 per cent dip in murders for the month of September, which saw 77 murders — including that of four children, two women and two cops — being committed in comparison to 132 in September 2009. This is the first time since July 2002 that the monthly tally has dipped below 80.


The gun was the most-used weapon. Fifty-seven persons were shot to death, 12 were killed by knives and three were chopped to death; while five murders were committed with implements listed as 'other'. There were also two drive-by shootings and four double murders last month.


Fatal shootings by the police also declined from 21 in September last year to 12 last month.


Police statistics indicate that 81 persons were shot and injured last month, a 39 per cent drop from the 132 shootings documented in September 2009.


Twelve revolvers, 15 pistols, a submachine gun, one homemade gun and a rifle, a total of 30 guns, were seized last month, 13 less than in September last year. A total of 175 rounds of assorted ammunition were also seized last month.






Allan ‘Skill’ Cole among 10 honoured by JFF

Webmin
No Comments



Former footballer Allan ‘Skill’ Cole were among ten people who were honoured by the JFF for their significant contribution to the development of football in Jamaica. They were honoured at a reception held on the occasion of the visit of the president of the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA), Joseph Sepp Blatter, at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel September 26.

"It is great, great pleasure for me to be with you," said Blatter. "I am grateful now to be with you when awards are being presented to those who have served over the years and all volunteers in this sport."

The awardees were former prime minister and current chairman of the Premier League Clubs' Association, Edward Seaga; former prime minister P.J. Patterson; former St Catherine FA president for 42 years, Lincoln 'Happy' Sutherland; former national footballer and coach, Allan 'Skill' Cole; coach of Seba United, Weston King; football administrator and coach, John Green; former president of Kingston and St Andrew Footbal Association (KSAFA) and former vice-president of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), David 'Billy' Marston; former general secretary of KSAFA and the JFF, Russell Bell; former Trelawny FC president, Neville Glanville; and JFF administrator and Santos coach, Carlton Dennis.

JFF President Captain Horace Burrell pointed out that there are other persons deserving of awards who will be acknowledged in the future.

"There are many others who are quite deserving of awards ... your time will come, don't worry about it," he affirmed. "We are only awarding 10 persons tonight; in the future we will be awarding more."

Cole, who is the youngest player to represent Jamaica at the national level - age 16 - was very pleased to finally be honoured in his own country.

"I lived in Ethiopia for three years and in one season I got a lot of accolades in the country," said Cole. "I have played for Jamaica from I was 16 and just getting an award, so I must cherish and honour it.

"I feel very honoured and it is good to know people recognise what you are doing and you are honoured before you pass away," said Dennis in response to being recognised.





Happy Birthday Daddy Marcus

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica's first National Hero was born in St. Ann's Bay, St. Ann, on August 17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston, where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".


During his career Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries, observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.
In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self-government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects and protest against racial discrimination.
In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.
However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.
Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity, forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections but won a seat on the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC).


But the world of the 1930s was not ready for Garvey's progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.


Garvey's legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught - race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for rulers to govern on behalf of the working classes.







The Cabinet has approved the establishment of a Committee and Secretariat to lead the celebration of Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence in 2012.


The Planning Committee will be drawn from representatives of the private cultural sector; tourism, education, youth, financial, agriculture and mining sectors; as well as the religious community, among other sectors.


The Planning Committee along with the Secretariat which will be housed at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, will be responsible for the planning and implementation of activities toward the Jamaica 50 celebrations including the staging of CARIFESTA as part of Jamaica 50 celebrations.


Minister Grange said:“We want to our jubilee celebrations in 2012 to be the best yet. Jamaica 50 will be memorable. We will celebrate our strengths as a nation as we plan for the future with purpose, faith and confidence.”<


The Secretariat will be supported by the agencies of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, in particular the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission.


Jamaica will celebrate 50 years as an independent nation on August 6, 2012.





BDA1.jpg





Michael Jackson Humanitarian Deeds

Webmin
2 Comments

0023ae606f170b29c7d05d.jpg
April 14, 1984: Michael equips a 19-bed-unit at Mount Senai New York Medical Center. This center is part of the T.J. Martell-Foundation for leukemia and cancer research.



July 5, 1984: During the Jackson's press conference at Tavern On The Green, Michael announces that his part of the earnings from the Victory Tour will be donated to three charitable organizations: The United Negro College Fund, Camp Good Times, and the T.J. Martell-Foundation.



July 14, 1984: After the first concert of the Victory Tour, Michael meets 8 terminally ill children backstage.





Happy Mother’s Day

Webmin
3 Comments

Happy_Mothers_Day.jpg
This Sunday the world over will be celebrating Mother’s Day…but how did it all come about? How come we are now recognizing the significant contribution that mothers have made from creation?



The history of Mother's Day is centuries old and the earliest Mother's Day celebrations can be traced back to the spring celebrations of ancient Greece in honor of Rhea, the Mother of the Gods. During the 1600's, the early Christians in England celebrated a day to honor Mary, the mother of Christ. By a religious order the holiday was later expanded in its scope to include all mothers, and named as the Mothering Sunday. Celebrated on the 4th Sunday of Lent (the 40 day period leading up to Easter), "Mothering Sunday" honored the mothers of England.



In the United States, Mother's Day was loosely inspired by the British day and was first suggested after the American Civil War by social activist Julia Ward Howe. During the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870s, Julia began a one-woman peace crusade and made an impassioned "appeal to womanhood" to rise against war. In 1872, she went to London to promote an international Woman's Peace Congress. She began promoting the idea of a "Mother's Day for Peace" to be celebrated on June 2, honoring peace, motherhood and womanhood. In the Boston Mass, she initiated a Mothers' Peace Day observance on the second Sunday in June, a practice that was to be established as an annual event and practiced for at least 10 years. The day was, however, mainly intended as a call to unite women against war. The celebrations died out when she turned her efforts to working for peace and women's rights in other ways. Howe failed in her attempt to get the formal recognition of a Mother's Day for Peace.





Michael Lee-Chin

Webmin
2 Comments

MichaelLeeChin_188.jpgMichael Lee-Chin was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica to black and Chinese Jamaicans. When Lee-Chin was 7 his mother married Vincent Chen. He attended Titchfield High School between 1962 and 69.

In 1970 he earned a scholarship to study Civil Engineering at McMaster University in Canada. He worked briefly as a road engineer for the Jamaican Government but unable to find a job in his qualified field he returned to Canada.

He had various jobs until he secured a loan in 1983 for C$500,000 from the Continental Bank of Canada and purchased a stake in Mackenzie Financial Group and formed Kicks Athletics with Andrew Gayle which was worth C$3.5 million by 1987.

With these proceeds he bought a Kitchener based company called the Advantage Investment Council for C$200,000. He renamed the company AIC and developed it into a fund that today controls C$6 billion, with hundreds of investors.

He continued to form and acquire companies that deals in investments, securities and insurance through the Berkshire Group of Companies which by 2007 amassed C$12 billion in assets. On October 5, 2006, Lee-Chin announced his resignation fron AIC and was replaced by Johnathan Wellum, AIC's Chief Investment Officer. He remains as AIC's Executive Chairman.





Robert L. Johnson

Webmin
No Comments

robert_johnson.jpgRobert L. Johnson was born in Hickory, Mississippi on April 8, 1946. He was the ninth of ten children born to Edna and Archie Johnson. He studied history at the University of Illinois, where he graduated with a bachelor's degree. He also earned a master's degree in International Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

In 1979 he founded Black Entertainment Television (BET), which was the first cable television aimed at African Americans. It was launched in January 1980, broadcasting for two hours per week.
Presently, BET reaches more than 65 million US homes. It has become the first black-controlled company listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

BET has expanded into other BET -related television channels that encompasses the BET Networks: BETJ, BET Hip Hop and BET Gospel.
In 1998 Johnson made the company private by buying back all of its publicly traded stock. In 1999 Viacom bought BET for $3 billion. Johnson's 63 percent share made him the richest black person (before being usurped by Oprah Winfrey) with assets of a billion dollars after taxes. He continued to be the company's chairman and CEO for six years before turning over the titles of President and Chief Operating Officer of BET to Debra L. Lee a former BET vice president.

Johnson started the RLJ Companies whose goal was to create a holding company and asset management firm run by a minority business person. The RLJ Companies has a diverse portfolio of companies touching on all area of their business industry, ie. real estate, financial service, hospitality, sports, film, automotive and gaming. RLJ has headquarters all across the USA.





Black Uhuru

Webmin
1 Comment

black_uhuru.jpgThe reggae band Black Uhuru was formed by Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson in the 1970's. The band whose name Uhuru is Swahili for freedom was the first group to win a Grammy when the reggae category was introduced in 1985 for the single "What is Life' on the "Anthem'" album.

Over the years the group went through many changes; the first group members were Garth Dennis, Don Carlos and Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson. Then Carlos left and was replaced by Michael Rose, then Dennis left and was replaced by Errol Nelson. During this period the band released its most famous album "Love Crisis" later re-released as "Black Sounds of Freedom". Sandra 'Puma' Jones joined the group in 1979 and with this new line-up; Rose, Simpson and Jones, along with Sly & Robbie as producers and drum and bass players, they release "Sinsemilla", "Red", "Chill Out" and the Grammy winning "Anthem", which were there most popular album.

Black Uhuru became one of the most popular reggae groups in the world touring with super stars such as the Police, the Rolling Stones and the Clash.





Portia Simpson-Miller

Webmin
No Comments

Portia Simpson-Miller.jpgPortia Lucretia Simpson-Miller ON, MP was born on December 12, 1945 in Wood Hall, St. Catherine. She has the distinction of being Jamaica's first female Prime Minister from March 30, 2006 - September 11, 2007. She is presently the President and Leader of the Opposition. She is also a member of the 'Council of Women World Leaders' which is an International network of former and current women presidents and prime ministers whose mission is to mobilize women leaders in a collective effort to take action on issues critical to women and equitable development.
Mrs Simpson-Miller became the third woman to become Prime Minister in the English speaking Caribbean, when she succeeded ongoing Prime Minister P.J. Patterson. She now holds the position as President of the opposition People's National Party.
Prior to being Prime Minister she was the Minister of local Government and Sport since 2002. She has also served as Minister of Labour, Welfare and Sports; Minister of Labour, Social Security and Sports; Minister of Tourism and Sports and Defence Minister.
On September 2007 her party narrowly lost the 2007 general election to the rival Jamaica Labour Party 32 to 28 seats (after recounts). Simpson-Miller initially refused to concede defeat citing unfair voting regulations, but finally conceded when the Organization of American States issued a statement declaring the election free and fair. She was succeeded as Prime Minister by JLP leader Bruce Golding.
In July 2008 she was challenged for the Presidency of the PNP by her rival Dr. Peter Phillips. The election was held among the party's delegates on September 20, 2008. She defeated Phillips by an even wider margin than that of the previous election.
Simpson-Miller holds a Bachelor of Arts in public administration from the Union Institute, who also gave her an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters.
She is married to the Most Honorable Errald Miller, former CEO of Cable & Wireless Jamaica Limited.
She was invested with the Jamaican O





Merlene Joyce Ottey

Webmin
3 Comments

Merlene Joyce Ottey.jpgMerlene Joyce Ottey was born on May 10, 1960 in Cold Spring, Hanover, Jamaica to Hubert and Joan Ottey. She was introduced to track & field by her mother.
Ottey attended Gurnrys Mount and Pondside Schools, Ruseas and Vere Technical high schools, where she competed in barefooted races.
Ottey was inspired by listening to track & field broadcasts of the 1976 Summer Olympics. Her athletic career took off while attending University of Nebraska in the USA in 1979.
Over time Ottey won many awards: In 1982 she won the gold medal in the 200m and silver in the 100m at the 1982 Commonwealth Games.
In the 1990 Commonwealth Games she won gold in both events. She was named Ambassador of Jamaica for the Year 15 times between 1979 - 1997.
In total, Ottey has won right Olympic medals, but never an Olympic gold. She has to her credit three silver and five bronze medals which earned her the nickname "The Bronze Queen". She also has won 14 World Championship medals between 1983 - 1997- more than any other althete, male or female.
On 1999 a banned substance was descovered in her urine and she was banned from competing in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia. She also pulled out of the World Championships as she strove to clear her name, which she eventually did by the summer of that year in time to be selected to compete in the Olympic games.
She ran fourth in the controversial race and vowed that even though she could still run at 40 she would not run for Jamaica anymore as she felt as they were trying to push her out of the sport.





Arthur Wint - Jamaica's first Olympic gold medalist

Webmin
No Comments

arthur_wint.jpgArthur Wint was born in Plowden, Manchester, Jamaica on May 3, 1920. He was the Jamaican Boy Athlete of the Year in 1937, he won a gold medal in the 800m at the Central American Games in Panama.

He joined the Royal Air Force and while undergoing training in Canada he set the 400m record. After taking part in active duty as a pilot in WWii he left the Air Force in 1947 to attend medical school at St. Bartholomews Hospital.

In 1948 he won Jamaica's fist gold medal for the 400m (46.2) in London beating team mate Herb McKenley. He also won the silver medal in the 800m.

Wint was also part of the historic relay team, in Helsinki's 1952 games, where they set the world record and captured the gold medal in the 4 X 400m relay. He also once again won siver in the 800m.

Arthur Wint ran his final race in 1953 at Wembley Stadium, completed his internship, graduated as a doctor and was made a Member of the British Empire (MBE) by Queen Elizabeth the following year.





Oprah Winfrey

Webmin
4 Comments

oprah_winfrey.jpgOprah Gail Winfrey was born January 29, 1954 in Kosciusko, Mississippi. She escaped a troubled childhood living with her mother where she was repeatedly sexually abused by male family members and friends, to live with her father in Nashville.
She attended Tennessee State University in 1971 and began working in radio and television.
In 1976 Oprah moved to Baltimore where she hosted the TV talk show, "People are Talking", the show was a hit and Oprah stayed with it for eight years. Her success led her to Stephen Speilberg's 1985 film "The Color Purple" for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.
She launched the Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. The show was such a success that she gained ownership of it from ABC and placed it under the control of her production company Harpo Productions and made more money from syndications. Her show free of tabloid topics earned her the respect and popularity of her viewers.
Harpo has undertaken many projects, one being the production of the 1989 miniseries "The Women of Brewsters Palce" which Oprah also starred in.
Oprah well known for her constant struggle with her weight is also known for the launching of "Oprah's Book Club" as part of her talk show. This is where novels are introduced, read and discussed on air.
Oprah has the distinction of being one of the most powerful and wealthy people in show business. According to Forbes Magazine, Oprah is the richest African American of the 20th century and the world's only black billionaire 3 years running.





Malcom X

Webmin
1 Comment

malcom x.jpgMalcolm Little (Malcolm X) was born in Omaha, nebraska, USA on May 19, 1925.
As a teenager he was involved in pimping and drugs. In 1946 he was arrested, charged and sentenced to ten years in prison for burglary. While in prison he discovered the anti-white Black Muslims.
In 1952 Malcolm joined the Muslims and became a recruiter, changed his name and began writing. He became well known for his 1959 television documentary. Both his writings and his documentary portrayed him as a threat to white people.
After breaking from the Muslims in 1964 he founded the Muslim Mosque in an effort to internationalize the Afro-American struggle. He travelled to Muslim lands and was impressed with their lack of racial bias. He became convinced that whites were not all born inherently racist. He once again re-invented himself and called himself El-Haff Malik El Shabazz and formed the Organisation of African American Unity in hopes of co-operating with progressive white groups.
Malcolm influenced the movements of black power and neo-colonialism by transforming the consciousness of generations of African-Americans.
He was assassinated in New York City in 1965, and it was believed that members of the Nation of Islam were involved.





Louis Armstrong

Webmin
No Comments

lois-armstrong.jpgLouis Armstrong born on August 4, 1901 in New Orleans, Louisiana USA was one of the leading trumpeters and most influential jazz artistes of his time.
Armstrong grew up poor and did odd jobs while listening to jazz music and singing in a boys' quartet. While spending time in Waifs Home for coloured juvenile delinquents (1913) he learned to play cornet in the home's band. Music quickly became his passion and in his teens he quickly learned more about music by listening to jazz musicians such as King Oliver. He became skilled and was soon playing in jazz bands and even replaced Oliver in the Kid Ory Band (1918), and played in Mississippi riverboat dance bands during the early 20's.
Oliver invited Armstrong to play second cornet in his Creole Jazz Band which included outstanding musicians such as Johnny and Baby Dodds and pianist Lil Hardin who he later married in 1924.
Armstrong recorded his first soloist pieces "Chimes Blues" and "Tears" which he produced with his wife.
Lil encouraged Armstrong to quit Oliver's band and he played in Fletcher Henderson's band in New York for a year before returning to Chicago to play in large orchestras. There he created his most important works - The Armstrong Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings of 1925 - 1928 which made him the first jazz soloist. He recorded solo pieces such as "Hotter than That", "Struttin' with some Barbecue" among others. By this time Armstrong was playing trumpet and his style was far superior to that of his competitors.





Maya Angelou

Webmin
9 Comments

maya_angelou.jpgMaya Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. Both she and her brother, Bailey, were sent to live with their grandmother in rural Stamps, Arkansas when their parents separated.
During a visit to her mother in St. Louis Maya Angelou was raped by her mother's boyfriend - she was eight. She later testified against the man, who was beaten to death by her uncles. Blaming herself for his death, Maya refused to speak for five years.
She attended high schools in both Arkansas and California and was the first African American female streetcar conductor in San Francisco, California.
She gave birth to a son at 16 and later married Tosh Angelos in 1950. They soon separated.
Maya Angelou studied drama and dance and went on to perform in theatre where she appeared in "Porgy and Bess" and "Cabaret for Freedom" which she co-wrote with Godfrey Cambridge.
During the 1960's she moved to Cairo, Egypt where she worked as the associate editor of the Arab Observer. She also contributed articles to The Ghanaian Times and was featured on the Ghanaian Broadcasting Corporation programming Accra, Ghana. During the 1960's she was also the Assistant administrator of the School of Music and Drama at the University of Ghana. She was also the feature editor of the African Review in Accra from 1964-1966. Upon her return to the USA civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requested that she serve as northern coordinator for Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
She wrote her first autobiographical novel " I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings" in 1970, which tells of her life up to the age of sixteen.





The "doctress" Mary Seacole

Webmin
1 Comment

487px-Mary_Seacole_Drawing.jpgMary Seacole, born in Kingston in 1805 to a Scottish army officer and a free black woman who not only nursed the sick, ran a boarding house but who also taught her daughter about the healing properties of herbal medicine.

Mary Seacole, using herbal medicine, played a pivotal role in not only the 1850 cholera epidemic but also the yellow fever outbreak in Jamaica. As her notoriety grew she was soon performing operations on persons suffering from gunshot and knife wounds.

From her travels across the Caribbean, Mary Seacole increased her knowledge of how people used local plants and herbs to treat the sick. She also treated persons afflicted with cholera in Panama. Mary learnt more about how the cholera disease attacked the body by performing an autopsy on one of its victims.

When soldiers of the Crimean War began to suffer from cholera and malaria, Mary went to London to offer her help and expertise but was rejected due to prejudice against women performing medicine. However, when the government was forced to change their minds they enlisted the less skilled Florence Nightingale along with a team of thirty-nine nurses. Mary's application to join Florence Nightingale's team was denied.

A successful business woman at the time, Mary travelled to Crimea at her own expense. She visited Florence Nightingale to offer her services but was once again turned down.





Independence Day of Jamaica

Webmin
6 Comments

The Spanish and the English rule

The Spanish settlers moved to Villa de la Vega, now known as Spanish Town, establishing it as the capital of Jamaica. The 1640s saw many people coming to Jamaica for its stunning beauty; especially the pirates who had a reputation of deserting their raiding parties and staying on in the island. The attacks by the pirates in Jamaican history can be traced back to nearly 100 years, between 1555 and 1655; the final attack leaving the island in the hands of the English.

The island of Jamaica was finally seized by the British forces in the form of a joint expedition by Admiral Sir William Penn and General Robert Venables in May 1655. The buccaneers were invited by the Governor to form their base at Port Royal to prevent Spanish aggression in 1657. The Spanish were defeated in the successive battles that followed, starting the extended reign of the British on Jamaican soil. Through the Treaty of Madrid in 1670, the British gained formal recognition of possession of Jamaica. Still part of the Island remained in the hands of some of the escaped slaves called the 'Maroons', with whom they signed a treaty on March 1, 1738. Even though much of the Spanish capital, Villa de la Vega, was burned during the English conquest, they renamed it Spanish Town and kept it as the island's capital.





Information on Emancipation Day

Webmin
2 Comments

The Road to Freedom

The day was August 1, the year 1838 and the event, Emancipation from Slavery. Tears of joy flowed incessantly, while shouts of freedom rang from the mountain tops and the plains, from the men, women and children, who had learnt that they were finally free of the oppressive social and economic system in which they were treated as less than human.

From its introduction in the West Indies in 15th Century, slavery was regarded by many as immoral and brutish, characterized by the destruction of the "innate characteristics of humankind, which are necessary for progress." The slave-owning class, who dominated the legislative system, drew up the slave laws, which were rigid. Some of these laws and punishments included forbidding slaves to hold meetings without permission from or under the supervision of a white person. Slaves were banned from beating drums and blowing horns as it was thought to be a signal of rebellion and they were severely beaten for slowing down in the fields.

The Quakers, a religious group, were among the first critics of the system and campaigned for its abolition. The campaign was led by Granville Sharpe, an English man who was successful in securing the freedom of an abandoned slave, Joseph Strong, in England 1787. The Quakers formed the 'Society For Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade' and others such as Sharpe, Thomas Clarkson, James Ramsey and Edmond Burke then joined it.

They argued that not only was slavery against the will of God, but was also the denial of civilization. They said that freedom was the true, natural state of man. However, their arguments proved futile as the sugar industry was booming.

Persons in favour of the system expressed the view that blacks were unprepared for freedom and would be harmed by it, and that not all men were born free and equal. They also held the view that Africans were different from whites and thus should be treated as animals.

It was not until the eighteenth century when the sugar industry began to decline that the anti-slavery movement received encouragement. The first victory for the abolitionist came in March of 1807, with the passage of the Bill for 'The Total and Immediate Abolition of the Slave Trade' in the British Parliament.

But, to a large extent, it was the slaves themselves who charted the course to their own freedom, by the many brutal revolts staged across the island. They had the help of the Maroons, those slaves who had escaped into the island's mountains. The most famous revolt was the 1831 "Christmas" or "Baptist War".

These rebellions, coupled with the decline in the sugar, caused a drain on the planters' coffers. With the possibility of a general uprising constantly threatening, the law to abolish slavery was once again proposed in the British Parliament in 1833 and this time was passed with little resistance.





edit-mikey-dread_dead.jpgA memorial service will be held this Saturday in Portland, Jamaica for the late television presenter, top radio personality, record producer and artist.


1976-1979

Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation in Kingston, Jamaica - Presenter: "Dread at the Controls Show" Technical Operator: Audio programs both live and recorded.

Awarded: Top Radio Personality in Jamaican Radio based on the unusual impact made on radio listeners and the popularity of recordings made.

Recorded/produced single: "Barber Saloon." Charted at number one on the local radio charts recorded several Top 10-reggae singles.

Performed live at Reggae Sunsplash in Jamaica along with other featured artists including Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Inner Circle, and Third World.

Produced first album "Dread at the Controls" (Trojan Records-London) and "African Anthem" (A Special Edition from Jamaica's radio program for Cruise Records-UK).

Worked at Treasure Isle Recording Studio-Jamaica as Audio Engineer.

Traveled to London on a promotional trip.





G.Stiebelpict2.jpgThere was every indication at a very early stage that George Stiebel was destined to lead an intriguing life. Born to a Jamaican housekeeper, and a German Jew in the 1820s, George was subject to a range of criticisms and harsh treatment from his peers as a result of his mixed parentage. School was therefore not as fulfilling an experience as it should have been, and he quit the classroom at age fourteen to become a carpenter’s apprentice. George quickly developed a flair for carpentry, and by age 19 he played an integral role in the reconstruction of the famous Ferry Inn, between Kingston and Spanish Town.

In the 1840's, George's father gave him start up capital to purchase a ship, which he began using to transport cargo between North and South America. Shortly after he purchased two additional ships to develop his new business venture in the Caribbean, including Cuba where a revolution was in high gear. He realized that the island would be ideal to undertake a lucrative gun-trading ring. While he did manage to make respectable profits from trading guns, he also fell in trouble with the law for his activities.

In 1851, George's life took a turn for the better when he married long time sweetheart Magdalene Baker, daughter of a Moravian Missionary. Soon after their son, Sigismund, named after George's father, was born. Two years later a girl, Theresa, joined the Stiebel family. Five years after their marriage, his ships were caught in a terrible storm, which destroyed the vessels. Unfortunately Stiebel was aboard one of the ships which sank off the coast of Venezuela. He managed to survive the wreckage and luckily he had the foresight to secure all his money which was stored in a leather belt. Stiebel's tenacity soon began to show results, because shortly after arriving in Venezuela he became a peddler, and with his savings he purchased a mule to assist in transporting his goods. His misfortune at sea quickly dulled when he began trading gold in Venezuela. He invested in a gold mine with his friends, and fifteen years later in 1873 the business was showing huge profits. George Stiebel had undoubtedly made an impressive stake in the gold mining business and the accolade awarded to him as Jamaica's first millionaire of African descend seemed very deserving and appropriate. His achievements were shattered however with the death of his son, and he returned home to Jamaica.





Booker T Washington – a life worth emulating

Webmin
6 Comments

booker_t_washington.jpgFor all those who have the opportunity of going to school and are procrastinating then read the story of Booker T Washington. Imagine having to walk 200 miles to get an education! His life should inspire us to forget about the minor irritations and really get focused on making more of our lives!

(1856-1915) - Lecturer, Civil Rights/Human Rights Activist, Educational Administrator, Professor, Organization Executive/Founder, Author/Poet.

Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hale's Ford, Virginia, reportedly on April 5, 1856. After emancipation, his family was so poverty stricken that he worked in salt furnaces and coal mines beginning at age nine. Always an intelligent and curious child, he yearned for an education and was frustrated when he could not receive good schooling locally. When he was 16 his parents allowed him to quit work to go to school. They had no money to help him, so he walked 200 miles to attend the Hampton Institute in Virginia and paid his tuition and board there by working as the janitor.





Garrett Morgan – inventor extraordinaire

Webmin
7 Comments

GarrettMorgan.jpgMost people hearing the name Garrett Morgan can associate it with he being the man who invented the traffic light – but his work goes far beyond that. He also designed the first gas mask for use by firefighters, too.

Garrett Augustus Morgan was born on March 4, 1877 in Paris, Kentucky. He was the seventh of eleven children, and he spent his childhood working on their farm and attending elementary school.

At the age of 14 Garrett Morgan moved to Cincinnati, Ohio and hired a tutor so he could continue his English grammar studies. Garrett moved again in 1895, this time to Cleveland, Ohio and went to work for a clothing manufacturer as a repairman for the sewing machines. He did such a good job that news of his proficiency and experimentation spread quickly around town, and many job offers came pouring in.

In 1909, he had already opened his own tailoring shop when he came upon an interesting situation that led to the first of his famous inventions. Garrett noticed that the needles moved so fast through the wool fabrics, that the friction often caused them to scorch the fabric. He decided to try to come up with a liquid to polish the needles and reduce the friction. One day, when his wife called him for dinner, he wiped the liquid from his hands onto a pony-fur cloth to clean them. When he returned after dinner, he noticed that the fibers were standing up straight now. He thought that the liquid must have straightened them. He decided to test this theory by applying the liquid to the fur of his neighbor's dog, which was an Airedale.





Harriet Tubman – The Black Moses of her people

Webmin
5 Comments

harriet_tubman.jpgMartin Luther King, Malcolm X and others have dominated when it comes to imparting the achievements of blacks...but not enough is sung about Araminta Ross aka Harriet Tubman. Many often refer to her as 'the Moses of her people.' Get familiar with her inspiring story.

Born around 1820 in Bucktown, Maryland. Reared in slavery, she married a free black, John Tubman, in 1844. He opposed her plans to flee north, so she escaped alone via the Underground Railroad in 1849, and over the next decade she led nearly 300 Maryland slaves to safety, including several siblings and her elderly parents.

Harriet was a deeply devoutly religious woman and a believer in decisive action. She helped John Brown organize his 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia, but was prevented by illness from accompanying him. During the Civil War she repeatedly went behind enemy lines to spy for the Union, and recruit slaves to fight in the army.

In her later years, living in Auburn, New York, she helped support relatives and other former slaves, and raised money for freedmen's schools and a home for elderly blacks.

While Harriet Tubman remains one of history's best-known African Americans, until recently there have been few biographies of her written for adults. Because her life is inspiring, there are appropriately many children's stories about Tubman, but these tend to stress her early life, her own escape from slavery, and her work with the Underground Railroad. Less well known and neglected by many historians are her Civil War service and her activities in the nearly 50 years she lived after the Civil War ended. In this article, you'll find details about Harriet Tubman's life in slavery and her work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, but you'll also find information about Tubman's later and less-known work and life.





THE HISTORY OF VALENTINE'S DAY

Webmin
18 Comments

red-cupid.jpgValentine's Day started in the time of the Roman Empire. In ancient Rome, February 14th was a holiday to honor Juno. Juno was the Queen of the Roman Gods and Goddesses. The Romans also knew her as the Goddess of women and marriage. The following day, February 15th, began the Feast of Lupercalia.

The lives of young boys and girls were strictly separate. However, one of the customs of the young people was name drawing. On the eve of the festival of Lupercalia, the names of Roman girls were written on slips of paper and placed into jars. Each young man would draw a girl's name from the jar and would then be partners for the duration of the festival with the girl whom he chose. Sometimes the pairing of the children lasted an entire year, and often, they would fall in love and would later marry.

Under the rule of Emperor Claudius II, Rome was involved in many bloody and unpopular campaigns. Claudius the Cruel was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. He believed that the reason was that Roman men did not want to leave their loves or families. As a result, Claudius canceled all marriages and engagements in Rome.





Bob Marley – The man and his music

Webmin
11 Comments

By: Kemesha Bolton

BOBMARLEY.jpgIn highlighting the legend that has surpassed all expectation and given us all a sense of who we are; we celebrate his birth, music and his death on this day his Earthstrong.


HIS BIRTH

There was no event which took place during the early hours of the morning in rural St. Ann, Jamaica when newly wed, nineteen year old Cedella Malcolm-Marley gave birth to her first child.

The 'moon faced' Cedella suffered greatly from morning sickness. When she went into labour on Sunday evening, she was taken to the house of her father, Omeriah Malcolm. She remained in labour through all of Monday; then at 2:30 the following morning Robert Nesta was finally delivered: a fawn colored boy with nose of his father Captain Norval Sinclair Marley.

Just after sunrise the after birth was wrapped carefully in a page from the Gleaner that contained a story describing the arrest in Kingston the day before of a young rude boy who had stolen 35 pounds from a Chinaman. The Hooligans alias was Pearl Harbor.

The after birth was buried at the foot of a young mango sapling that would from that day forth be Nesta's 'frenly tree', it would grow as tall and as strong as he wished it to, it's health and height reflecting his care; it would bend with the passage of time in the same direction as its cultivator.





In the beginning was Reggae!

Webmin
4 Comments

reggae ramp halspark.jpgThe word "reggae" was coined around 1960 in Jamaica to identify a "ragged" style of dance music, that still had its roots in New Orleans rhythm'n'blues.

However, reggae soon acquired the lament-like style of chanting and emphasized the syncopated beat. It also made explicit the relationship with the underworld of the "Rastafarians" (adepts of a millenary African faith, revived Marcus Garvey who advocated a mass emigration back to Africa), both in the lyrics and in the appropriation of the African nyah-bingi drumming style (a style that mimicks the heartbeat with its pattern of "thump-thump, pause, thump-thump").

Compared with rock music, reggae music basically inverted the role of bass and guitar: the former was the lead, the latter beat the typical hiccupping pattern. The paradox of reggae, of course, is that this music "unique to Jamaica" is actually not Jamaican at all, having its foundations in the USA and Africa.





Influences of Blacks on the world

Webmin
4 Comments

carver_george1.jpgAs we celebrate black history month you can't help but reflect on the great contributions blacks made in making life better for all.

YardFlex in celebration of Black History Month will be featuring some outstanding black luminaries throughout the month.

We start off with George Washington Carver one of the most famous black inventor in history.

His contributions to the world in the areas of agriculture have influenced the economy and provided us with great products ranging from peanut butter to colors for our clothing.

George Washington Carver was born on July 12, 1864 in Diamond Grove, Missouri. He was a sickly child who would remain that way for the majority of his childhood years. He and his mother lived on a farm owned by Moses and Susan Carver, when they were kidnapped during a raid one night. Days later, neighbors found George and returned him to the Carvers, but now he had contracted whooping cough. His mother was nowhere to be found, so the Carver family raised him as their own.

Because of his poor health, George Washington Carver was not able to help out by working in the fields, but he did have a great interest in plants, and even planted his own garden in the woods near their farm. He produced medicines for his family and was soon given the nicknamed, 'The Plant Doctor.'

George was unable to get into any schools until he was 12, due to his race. To get into first formal school, he had to move to Newton County, Missouri and leave his adoptive parents behind, because there were no black schools any closer. He worked on a farm to earn money for his education in a one-room schoolhouse. Shortly afterward, he moved with another family to Fort Scott, Kansas.

When it was time to move on and continue his education at the University level, George Washington Carver again ran into resistance because of the color of his skin. After being denied entrance into Highland University, he was accepted into Simpson College in Iowa in the year 1890. George was very talented in Art, and earned great respect for that, but his passion was in Science and Agriculture. He transferred to the Iowa Agricultural College, which is now known as Iowa State University, and graduated in 1894. Upon graduation, Carver was offered a position on the faculty and allowed great freedom in the school's greenhouses to pursue his agricultural work. He was the first African American to be offered a faculty position at that College.

In 1896, George Washington Carver received his Master's Degree in Agriculture having co-authored a series of papers on the cures for fungus diseases. In 1897, he discovered two new fungi that were later named after him.

Booker T. Washington convinced George to come down to the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to serve as the Director of Agriculture in 1897.





Oh we miss the Israelite!

Webmin
3 Comments

music-dvd-a-dekker.jpgDesmond Dekker thrilled the world with his ska-laced songs and without a doubt when he died on May 25, 2006 he left a rich legacy of songs that can never be forgotten.

Desmond was the first musician who carried the music from his home Jamaica to the rest of the world. He is considered one of the ancestors of ska. YardFlex take time out to salute the man who made his contribution to the genre.

Desmond Dacres was born in 1942 in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of 19 he met the influential Leslie Kong and who would have supposed that by now a new legend was born? In 1963, the newly named Dekker released his first single, "Honor Your Father And Mother," which was also issued in the UK courtesy of Chris Blackwell's Island label. During the same period, Dekker teamed up with his backing group, the Aces. Together they enjoyed enormous success in Jamaica during the mid-late 60's with a formidable run of 20 number 1 hits to their credit.

The emergence of rocksready in the latter half of 1966 propelled his James Bond inspired "007 (Shanty Town)" into the UK charts the following year. Also the single presaged Dekker's emergence as an
internationally famous artist. 1969 proved the year of Dekker's greatest worldwide success. "Get up in the morning, slaving for bread, sir, so that every mouth can be fed", was a patois-sung opening line which entranced and confused pop listeners on both sides of the Atlantic. The intriguing "Israelites" was a club hit the previous year and by the spring of 1969 had become the first reggae song to top the UK charts ever!





Remembering Dennis Brown

Webmin
12 Comments

dennis_brown.jpgJuly 1, 1999 will be a day remembered by lovers of good reggae music...it's the day when one of the greatest Reggae crooners – Dennis Brown made his exit from the world.

At age 42, he was definitely a life cut short way too soon. Yet in that span he managed to leave the world a rich legacy of feel good songs that decades from now will still be hot.

In a career that spanned almost 4 decades, Dennis worked with many of reggae's top names, beginning with Coxsone Dodd at Studio One, going on to work with such artistes and producers as Winston (Niney) Holness, Joe Gibbs, Derrick Harriott, Herman Chin-Loy, Sidney Crooks, Prince Buster, Randy's, Phil Pratt and GG Ranglin. The list goes on with Clive Hunt and Willie Lindo, engineer Errol Thompson, Sly & Robbie, Gussie Clarke, Tad Dawkins, Trevor Bow, Bunny Lee and Delroy Wright.

Dennis Emanuel Brown was born on February 1, 1957 in Kingston, Jamaica. Regularly billed as "The Crown Prince Of Reggae', it was only Brown's self-effacing nature that denied him advancement to the office of king. Loved in reggae music like no other singer, Brown was regularly courted by the major record labels, and even enjoyed a couple of token chart hits in Britain. More to the point, he produced more reggae classics than just about anyone else. Beginning his career at the age of 9 as one of the Studio One label's many child stars, his first hit, "No Man Is An Island" (1969), found him singing in much the same style he was to use throughout his career, only with a far less croaky voice.

"If I Follow My Heart", another major hit at Studio One, was every bit as good. He spent the early 70s freelancing between studios, recording for Lloyd Daley, Impact, Joe Gibbs and Aquarius, before recording his third collection, "Super Reggae And Soul Hits," a mature, classic record, full of Derrick Harriott's soulful arrangements and Brown's rich tones. A move to Winston "Niney" Holness' label was no less profitable. The two albums he made there, "Just Dennis" and "Wolf & Leopards," were recorded three years apart but their seamless rootsy artistry made them clearly part of one body of work.

A long, fruitful liaison with Joe Gibbs and Errol Thompson resulted in a further series of classic albums, among them "Visions," "Joseph's Coat Of Many Colours," "Spellbound" and "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow." While the rock critics were latching on to dub in the mid-70s, it was Brown who was drawing a mass audience almost unnoticed outside reggae's heartlands.





Ross Kemp looks at the gang violence in Kingston, Jamaica and examines the political history involved...





The Origins of Black History Month

Webmin
3 Comments

carter_g_woodson.jpgIn 1926, Negro History Week was established to honor the accomplishments of African Americans. Carter G. Woodson, a black historian known as the Father of Black History, as well as others proposed the observance. During the 1970s, the observance became known as Black History Week.

In 1976, Black History Month was established. Black History Month is observed each year in February. It coincides with the birthdays of the great black leader Frederick Douglass (February 14) and Abraham Lincoln (February 12).

The celebration is sponsored by the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History in Washington, DC, which Woodson founded in 1915.





selassie.jpgNational Geographic reported that in 1930, as the dawn cleared in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on November 2, it met everyone getting ready for the special historical event to take place that morning - The Coronation of The Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah.

Together with his Empress, His Imperial Majesty, Haile Selassie I spent the night before in prayer and devotion at the most high alter. During the morning chanting of praises resonated and dancing priests with pulsating drum rhythms joined in. Ancient Jewish rites which were in use at the time of King David, were re-lived right there before the ark of the covenant, the report stated. The Coptic Church in all its impressive might and splendor evoked biblical rituals that seemed to roll the centuries back.

As the time came for this coronation, which is the most important event in the Rastafarian Calendar today, His Imperial Majesty entered the ceremonial hall attired in white silk. He was escorted by aides and clergy and was preceded by waving incense burners.





Happy Heroes Day - Oct 15, 2007

Webmin
6 Comments

Jamaica celebrates yet another Heroes Day and in honour Yardflex pay tribute to the many who have laid the foundation that we can now enjoy true freedom. To the many unsung heroes whose work will not make it in the history books, to those who are still working behind the scenes making a difference in their own way.

Yardflex now take a brief look at our seven national heroes...they may be gone, but their work will be ringing out in the ages to come.

Garvey1.jpgMarcus Garvey
Marcus Mosiah Garvey stands out in history as one who was greatly committed to the concept of the Emancipation of minds. He sought the unification of all Blacks through the establishment of the United Negro Improvement Association and spoke out against economic exploitation and cultural denigration.

Jamaica's first national hero was born in Saint Ann's Bay on August17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".
During his career Marcus Garvey traveled extensively throughout many countries observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects; protest against racial discrimination and cultural activities.

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country. He spent many years in the United States pursuing his goal of Black Unification. However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections. The world of the thirties was not ready for Marcus Garvey’s progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.





Enkutatash (New Year) September 8, 2007

Webmin
4 Comments

sis carol.jpglivity ras poet.jpg
tarrus riley livity1.jpg
The Ethiopian New Year falls in September at the end of the big rains. The highlands turn to gold as the Meskel daisies burst out in all their splendor. Ethiopian children clad in brand new clothes dance through the villages giving bouquets of flowers and painted pictures to each household. September 11th is both New Year's Day and the Feast of St. John the Baptist.

The day is called Enkutatash meaning the "gift of jewels." When the famous Queen of Sheba returned from her expensive jaunt to visit King Solomon in Jerusalem, her chiefs welcomed her back by replenishing her treasury with enku or jewels. The spring festival has been celebrated since these early times and as the rains come to their abrupt end, dancing and singing can be heard at every village in the green countryside. After dark on New Year's Eve people light fires outside their houses.





Ethiopia.gifPrime Minister Meles Zenawi.jpg
On September 11, 2007 at midnight in Ethiopia, the New Year and New Millennium celebrations began amid lavish gatherings, religious zeal and positive messages from the country’s troubled government. Ethiopia and Ethiopians throughout the world marked this day with immense enthusiasm and will continue to celebrate for days to come.

In the 6th Century, the rest of the Christian world made revisions in its estimate of the date of Christ’s birth - but Ethiopia kept the old date, which means that 7 years after the rest of the world, the country is marking the start of the year 2000.

For Rastafarians worldwide, recognizing and aligning with the calendar of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Ethiopia (a unique slightly modified Julian calendar) has been a part of their lifestyle and today Rastas everywhere have begun to commemorate the beginning of the year 2000.





Caribbean Day Parade 2007 Largest in History

Webmin
7 Comments

parade.jpgparade 2.jpg
Eastern Parkway in Brookly, New York was the scene of great revelry as another Caribbean Day Parade was held. The Labour Day weekend has historically been a day of heavy feting for national of the Caribbean regions and their friends. Most prominent at the annual West Indian Caribbean day parade were Haitians and Trinidadians who displayed a joint float promoting their Christian faith. The float expressed the sentiments of many in attendance with its prophetic message - "Start to pray today, because you may not be here tomorrow."

There were an estimated one million people in attendance at the parade. Despite the prayer message displayed on the float, at least one person's prayers went unanswered as he became the lone reported casualty of the day. At around 4:00 p.m., gunshots rang out in excess at Troy Avenue, which left one 26 year-old man injured with two gun shots to his leg. The injuries are considered non-life threatening.





The Marcus Garvey Story

Webmin
5 Comments





Bob Marley interview 1979

Webmin
No Comments




Tifa and Popcaan win big at YVA's

Webmin
No Comments
tifa-and-popcaan.jpg

The fifth staging of the Youth View Awards show took place at the National Indoor Sports Centre on Saturday night. Celebs walked the Red Carpet and then went inside to hear the list of winners.

Dancehall artiste Tifa was the big winner of the night. Tifa was nominated in 8 categories and walked away with 6 awards. Among the awards were: Best Female Artiste, Best Music Video (a collaboration with Wayne Marshall and Fambo), Young,Hot and Hype female of the Year, Favorite Female Dancehall artiste, Female Fashion Icon and Favorite Collaboration for the song 'Swaggin' WTF' with Wayne Marshall and Fambo.

Popcaan was also a big winner as he walked away with 3 awards: Young, Hot and Hype Male of the Year, Best Summer Song for 'Raving' and Local Chart Topping song of the Year for 'Raving'. The event was hosted by Tami Chynn and Kruddy and the audience was treated to performances from: I Octane, Chris Martin, Tifa, Wayne Marshall, Fambo and Ikaya who did a superb tribute to Bob Marley.




Bob Marley: The Legend Lives On

Webmin
1 Comment
bob-marley.jpg
Bob Marley was born on Feb 6th, 1945, in St. Ann. His mom at the time was an 18 year old Jamaican native, and his dad was a 50 year old white navel captain. The couple got married in 1944 a year before Bob was born. In 1950 Marley moved to Trench Town - Kingston. After Marley dropped out of school he became interested in music. In early 1962 Bob Marley, Bunny Livingston, Peter McIntosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso and Cherry Smith formed a ska & rocksteady group called "The Teenager" which later became The Wailing Rudeboys it was changed again to The Wailing Wailers and eventually became The Wailers . 

Bob Marley has been a great influence in the lives of many present day musical artists and other performers. He grew up listening to the legendary Fats Domino, Ray Charles, Curtis Mayfield, the Drifters and Louis Jordan. 

Bob Marley would put his first record out on wax in February of 1962, the song was called "Judge not." When it came out it was an instant hit locally, but his international fame would not spread for a couple of years.

In 1969, the Wailers first tape was recorded, they were sent to England and released on Trojan records, it was Bob Marley and the Wailers first album and was titled 'Soul Rebels'. This album was only released in Jamaica and England and sold well. titled 'Exodus'

In 1976 'Rastaman Vibrations' was released and the album made its way on to  the American charts.  In December of 1976, an Assassination attempt took place at his house and Marley was shot. Another album was released and stayed on the European charts for 56 weeks.

In May of 1977 during the Exodus tour he was playing football and injured his toe. The injury never healed, and he never got it treated and continued on his tour. 

Marley's last concert would be in Pittsburgh on Sept. 23, 1980 at the Stanley Theater. He would undergo many different treatments to keep him alive longer, but on May 11th, 1981, Bob Marley died at the age of 36 from cancer. 

Although Bob has been dead for years, his music lives on through his sons: Stephen, Ziggy, Julian and Kymani.  Bob Marley not only was one of the greatest musicians in the history of music, he is also one of the greatest men in the history of the world, through his music he not only touched the lives of his fellow countrymen and he has influenced the lifestyles, attitudes and feelings of people all over the world.





BLACK HISTORY MONTH Feature: Nanny of the Maroons

Webmin
No Comments
nanny-of-the-maroons.jpg
Nanny, also called Nanny of the Maroons and Queen Nanny, was a leader of the Maroons in Jamaica. The Maroons were considered defiant Jamaican slaves who fled from the oppressive plantations and formed their own community in the hills. Nanny and her brothers: Accompong, Cudjoe, Johhny and Quao ran away from their plantation and lived in the Blue Mountain areas.

By 1720, Nanny and Quao had settled and controlled an area in the Blue Mountains. As a revolt leader, Nanny aided in the defeat of the British army in several battles. Nanny organized plans to free slaves and was very successful in doing this. Over a 5o year span, Nanny has been credited with freeing over 800 slaves. She also kept the slaves healthy due to her vast knowledge of herbs and her role as a spiritual leader.

The community in which Nanny settled was given the name Nanny Town and consisted of 500 acres of land granted to the runaway slaves. Nanny is one of the earliest leaders of slave resistance and one of the very few women.

The government of Jamaica declared Nanny a National Heroine in 1976. Her portrait graces the $500 Jamaican dollar bill.




Dennis Brown tribute to start Reggae Month

Webmin
No Comments
dennis-brown.jpg
Reggae Month kicks off next month, and with Jamaica celebrating 50 years, plans are well underway for this year's staging.

The Jamaica Reggae Industry Association (JaRIA) has met with Damian Crawford, Minister of State in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment and Lisa Hannah, Minister of Youth and Culture. Crawford assured JaRIA that the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) would be partnering with them to stage Reggae Month with a sponsorship of $4million. 

Under the theme Reggae 50 ... Jamaica's Heart and Soul, Reggae Month will kick off with the staging of the Dennis Brown Tribute Concert which will feature artistes such as Damian and Stephen Marley, Tarrus Riley, Cocoa Tea, Half Pint, Ken Boothe, Junior Reid and Beres Hammond. The event will take place on January 29 at Orange Street, Down Town.

JaRIA's signature event will be "Reggae Nights" WHICH WILL OPEN February 1st at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. This will be a celebration of musical heritage through classical, jazz, mento and ska. Reggae Month was officially declared by Sir Kenneth Hall, then Governor General of Jamaica, on January 24, 2008. The full calendar for Reggae Month will be revealed at a press launch today at the Bob Marley Museum.




Irie FM celebrates Peter Tosh

Webmin
No Comments

Peter Tosh

In celebration of Reggae month IRIE FM will hit the road again to pay homage to the legendary Peter Tosh

On Feb 27 IRIE FM will have a special outside broadcast at the Peter Tosh Museum in Bluefield, Westmorland

The media house will celebrate Peter Tosh life, work and legacy from 6 AM to 2 PM with the Running African show with Andrea Williams and Sunday Sunshine with Big A.

The IRE FM's broadcast will feature nyabinghi drummers, live performances and much more.

Enhanced by Zemanta







Another year, another Black History Month. There are currently lectures, readings, and performances taking place throughout the country.

Quanae Palmer-Chambliss, 41, is a single Black mother and education paraprofessional. She is raising four boys on her own. Quanae says that she recently moved to a beautiful townhouse complex in Edison, New Jersey.

“Management is very strict about the people they rent apartments to,” she explains to me; but, something else is on her mind even though it is Black History Month.

Quanae is concerned about certain Black folks who destroy apartment buildings and neighborhoods, she says, with Promethean speed and demolition-like efficiency.

“I wonder if some of their bad habits are attributable to a lack of Black leadership?,” she asked me.

“Black folks have had more great Black leaders than you can count. What more can Black leaders say to certain Black folks who simply just don’t get it?“ I responded.

Within the Black community, there are Black folks who simply have not absorbed the message of self-love, civility, and decency that is inherent in Black leadership narratives. Do Black folks bear any inverse responsibility to Black leaders who have emphasized social uplift and progress?

Even if Moses showed up in the ‘hood at midnight carrying a modified version of the Ten Commandments—these are tough times!—it is likely that young Black folks would refer to him on a first name basis as “Dog” or “Pop.”

About a few blocks into his mission—if the Black teenagers who have been killed and robbed by other Blacks for their Air Jordan sneakers, gold chains, and I-Pods are any indication—Black thugs might tell Moses to give up his Egyptian cotton robe, Barenia leather sandals, and 18-caret gold staff. And it is a strong possibility that he would be left butt naked standing on the sidewalk. Or Moses could be shot—possibly dead—and robbed.

Extreme?

Despite the gains some Blacks have made since the 1960s, there are also many other Blacks who are far from The Promised Land envisioned by many Black leaders.

Eugene Robinson, The Washington Post columnist, recently published a book called Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America. He argues that there are four distinct classes of Black-Americans: Mainstream, Abandoned, Transcendent, and Emergent.

I guess Quanae is alluding to Abandoned-class Blacks. Robinson defines this class as, “A large Abandoned minority with less hope of escaping poverty and dysfunction than at any time since Reconstruction’s crushing end.”

Quanae is fortunate. She could be living further south in Camden, New Jersey. It is one of the poorest cities in the nation.

While President Obama’s recent State of the Union Address highlighted American exceptionalism, he certainly did not address budget cuts well underway in many cities and states.

Camden recently laid-off 168 police officers, or 45 percent of its force, to close a budget gap. According to FBI crime data, Camden ranked second, only to St. Louis, as the most dangerous city in America in 2009.

As cities and states are compelled to close budget deficits, how are the abandoned, not to mention Black middle-class workers employed by the government, supposed to survive as cuts to government services and job layoffs continue unabated?

The U.S. government is staring in the face of potentially unimaginable social unrest. The turmoil we witness today in Cairo, Egypt could arrive on our doorsteps tomorrow, courtesy of the continued economic dislocation of millions of Americans.

Meanwhile, Black single working mothers like Quanae are forced to ask difficult questions about the vagaries of Black life at Ground Zero.

I told Quanae that to righteously respond to her question requires an understanding of what sociologists call “structural forces.” It also requires an inevitable “internal discussion” that Blacks must engage.

Meanwhile, Black intellectuals, scholars, and mental health professionals should consider establishing a national dialogue on Black civility.

This dialogue must address the violence, psychic alienation, distrust, and the disregard for Black life that plagues the Black
community.

Article written by Hakim Hasan






Black people you should know

Webmin
No Comments



AT A GLANCE:
The American Red Cross blood program of today is a direct result of the work of medical pioneer Dr. Charles Drew, beginning in 1940 and throughout World War II. Dr. Drew was instrumental in developing blood plasma processing, storage and transfusion therapy. His groundbreaking work in the large-scale production of human plasma was eventually used by the U.S. Army and the American Red Cross as the basis for blood banks.. THE STORY
RELATED INFO

Milestones:
1904 Charles Drew born on June 3, in Washington D.C.
1939 Drew married Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children
1940 Completes his doctoral thesis, titled "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".
1940 Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project.
1941 Drew was named director of the newly formed Red Cross Blood Bank .
1950 Drew died on April 1, in an auto accident while traveling to a medical convention
CAPS: Drew, Charles Drew, Charles Richard Drew, Dr. John Scudder, American Red Cross, ARY, blood bank, blood plasma, dried blood, blood transfusion, SIP, history, biography, inventor, invention, story, facts.
The Story:
Dr. Charles Richard Drew was the first person to develop the blood bank. His introduction of a system for the storing of blood plasma revolutionized the medical profession. Drew first utilized his system on the battlefields of Europe and the Pacific during World War II. He organized the world's first blood bank project in 1940 - Blood for Britain. He also established the American Red Cross Blood Bank, of which he was the first director.

Drew was born in Washington, D.C. June 3, 1904 to Richard and Nora Drew, and was the oldest of five children. In his youth he seemed headed for a career in athletics and the coaching field rather than for medicine, starring as a four letter man in Dunbar High School, Washington. He went on to study at Amherst College, where he was a star athlete, all-American half-back and captain of his Amherst College football team.

After graduation, Charles Drew was a coach and a biology and chemistry instructor at Morgan State College, Baltimore, Maryland. But a turning point in his life was at hand. It had become his ambition to enter the field of medicine. He resigned his job at Morgan State and went to Montreal, Canada, where he enrolled in McGill University's Medical School. There he was granted two fellowships and was awarded his doctorate of medicine and master of surgery degrees.

For two years following graduation, Dr. Drew was an intern and resident in Montreal hospitals. In 1935, he returned to the United States to accept an appointment as instructor in pathology at the College of Medicine of Howard University in Washington, D.C. During the next two years, he advanced to become assistant professor of surgery.

Dr. Drew showed such promise in his work at Howard University that in 1938, at a time when war clouds were gathering over Europe, he was recommended for one of the Rockefeller fellowships at Columbia aimed at promoting advanced training in all fields of medicine. It was through this fellow ship that he met Dr. John Scudder and began study under him.

Dr. Drew was married in 1939 to Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children, Bebe Roberta, Charlene Rosella, Rhea Sylvia, and Charles Richard, Jr. Shortly after, Dr. Drew earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from Columbia University in 1940, with a 200 page doctoral thesis under the title "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".

Drew received an urgent cablegram from a former teacher, who had returned to England. The cable requested 5,000 glass containers of dried plasma for transfusions, plus the same amount three weeks later. A large project was started in August 1940 to collect blood in New York City hospitals for the export of plasma to Britain. Dr. Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project. His notable contribution at this time was to transform the test tube methods of many blood researchers, including himself, into the first successful mass production techniques.

By this time it had become apparent that America probably would be drawn into the war. Military authorities in the United States were concerned with the need for a stockpile of blood reserves if hostilities should begin. Dr. Drew had emerged as a leading authority on mass transfusion and processing methods.

After discussions with medical leaders and the American Red Cross, the government asked the Red Cross to establish a pilot program similar to the Plasma for Britain Project but on a smaller scale. Charles Drew was named director of the Red Cross Blood Bank and assistant director of the National Research Council, in charge of blood collection for the United States Army and Navy. The pilot center was set up through the Red Cross chapter in New York City and began operation in February 1941.

In 1941, Dr. Drew returned to Howard University, where he gained new distinction, particularly in the training of young surgeons. He had spent a total of seven months in the two blood projects, yet in this very brief but productive period of his professional life, he made an outstanding contribution to what was to become a highly successful World War II blood procurement effort.

After Dr. Drew's return to Howard, he was appointed to several scientific committees and received honorary degrees from Virginia State and Amherst Colleges in 1945 and 1947. He was one of the first of his race to be selected for membership on the American Board of Surgery. He also received the Spingarn Medal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1944 for his outstanding contribution to human welfare.

The experience gained through Dr. Drew's efforts at the Red Cross New York center proved invaluable, and during World War II, 35 blood bank centers were in operation. By war's end, millions of donations had been received by the Red Cross, donations that made possible the saving of thousands of lives of wounded U.S. servicemen lives that would have been lost in earlier wars when blood therapy was unknown.

Mankind suffered a great loss in 1950 when, at the age of 45, Dr. Drew was killed in an automobile accident while driving to a scientific conference. His pioneering medical work has endured. How many lives have been saved because of his genius at turning basic biological research into practical production methods is impossible to determine. But it is a certainty that mankind owes a debt of gratitude to Charles Richard Drew.

BOOKS

WEB SITES

WHERE TO FIND

QUOTATIONS

HOW IT WORKS

DID YOU KNOW?

Inventor: Charles Richard Drew

Charles Drew photo courtesy Dr. Charles Drew, Medical Pioneer book cover

Criteria: First practical. Modern prototype.

Birth: June 3, 1904,in Washington, D.C.

Death: April 1, 1950 while traveling in rural North Carolina.

Nationality: American

Invention: Blood Bank

Blood drive photo courtesy American Red Cross

Function: noun / blood plasma

Definition: A place, usually a separate division of a hospital laboratory, in which blood is collected from donors, typed, and often separated into several components for future transfusion to recipients. The American Red Cross operates the largest blood bank in the U.S.





Let’s really celebrate Black History Month

Webmin
No Comments




By Rae ROQ

So February is Black History Month and we all know this, but how many of us take the time to think about it and actually celebrate in our own personal way?
Black History Month is more than a month created to remember great black people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Marcus Garvey, and Nelson Mandela. This is a month in which we can celebrate not only our freedom, but look towards a brighter future. African people have come from a lineage of bondage and progression. Our ancestors suffered more than we have, so it is only right to be grateful for everything that we have and are lucky to get.
From the Civil Rights movement, to black people breaking into the entertainment industry, dominating the sports scene, and America electing its first black president, we have shown that we are an evolving race capable of doing anything that we put our mind to. While chasing our own dreams it is only proper to pay homage to those who have paved the way.
There have been Jamaican artistes such as Grace Jones and Bob Marley who have created their own legacy. Many artistic concepts, such as photo shoot concepts used by present day super models like Amber Rose, have been revived from the portfolio book of Grace Jones. Bob Marley is still, and always will be, an international household name and icon. He will always be remembered for creating great music and trying to bring knowledge and positive vibes to the people.
Oprah Winfrey has made the Forbe's list year after year, but she is also well known for her generosity. She recently created her OWN network and has built a school for girls in Africa. Maya Angelou is one of the most inspirational writers to keep in mind when you want to put a pen to a pad and paint a picture with words.
Celebrate Black History Month this year by reading a great black book or watching a movie. Try researching a black person who has made great accomplishments online. You may be shocked to recognize that you may have something in common with them. Don’t let it pass you by this year.
Black is beautiful.





Top 9 Black Television Talk Show Hosts

Webmin
No Comments




You got questions? These nine television hosts probably had them too, for a wide array of celebrities, politicians, athletes, and everyday people with amazing stories. Check out our list of the nine best black television talk show hosts. 1. Oprah Winfrey Initially The Oprah Winfrey Show was just another talk show when it debuted in 1986. But what made it stand out and rise above the rest was the show’s host. Now The Oprah Winfrey Show is only a small part of Oprah’s empire, and in 2011, will cease to exist in its current format. But not because the show is cancelled, Oprah is moving onto something bigger than her own show. She’s starting her own network, appropriately called OWN.

2. Arsenio Hall The Arsenio Hall Show revolutionized late night television. Just ask Bill Clinton who many say would have never won the 1992 presidential election had it not been for his surprise appearance on that show.

3. Mo’Nique Unlike Arsenio, The Mo’Nique Show has a lot more competition in that late night slot. But the Oscar-winning comedienne has been able to hold her own against, pulling in her own unique audience on BET. While the rest of America was tuning into the drama of the late night talk show wars between Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno, plenty others tuned them out and tuned into Mo’Nique.

4. Tyra Banks A show about service as much as it was celebrity, through The Tyra Show, Tyra used her beauty and brains for good. What Oprah is to the stay-at-home moms of America, Tyra was to the teenagers of America who came home after school and needed a big sister to understand them.

5. Wendy Williams The popular radio DJ has successfully taken her format and gift of gossip to the small screen. Though Vh1 would air her radio show, The Wendy Williams Show has shown the queen of talk radio can also sit down on a couple of comfortable couch chairs and ask questions with the best of them.

6. Whoopi Goldberg The moderator of The View is fearless and isn’t afraid to call it like she sees it. And if someone else is calling it like she sees it on the show, she’s not afraid to retort or even walk away.

7. Montell Williams As a former Marine, and a victim to multiple scoliosis, Williams — an Emmy Award winning talk show host — used his show as a platform to bring awareness to various social issues in an aggressive style.

8. Star Jones The controversial panel member on The View during it’s early years was one of the sharpest and most entertaining women on the panel.

9. Tavis Smiley Many people were shocked when BET let Tavis Smiley’s contract as host of BET Tonight expire, but the charming media personality has landed on his feet. Now the host of his very own PBS show, Tavis Smiley, Smiley is doing what he does best, interviewing the people we’ve always wanted to talk to ourselves, asking them the questions we’ve always wanted to ask.








The Bob Marley Museum will on Friday, November 5 observe the 80th anniversary of the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I (The First) with a charity concert.

Fund raised will go towards the refurbishing of the Haile Selassie High.

"The school is in dire need of funds to assist with further development of the school, and it is with this in mind that the Friends of The Haile Selassie High School are doing their part in assisting in this project," said promoter Dr. Michael Barnett.

The concert line-up includes several well-known cultural reggae artistes such as Junior Reid with Andrew and Wada Blood, Determine, Warrior King, Andrew Tosh, Mikey General, Fred Locks, The Artist M, Herzon, The Uprising Roots Band, The Twelve Tribes of Israel and many more.

The show will also unveil a surprise vintage guest artiste.

The actual date of Haile Selassie’s coronation was November 2, 1930, but Dr. Barnett said the celebration was pushed back because of other events taking place on that day.





Jamaica a big winner at World Travel Awards

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica came out a big winner in the 2010 World Travel Awards, copping some 18 major awards in the travel and tourism categories.

At the gala ceremony held at the swanky Sandals Whitehouse European Village and Spa in Westmoreland on Friday (October 22), Jamaica took home honours for being Caribbean Leading Destination; Caribbean Leading Cruise Destination Excursion; Caribbean Leading Airport (Sangster International); Caribbean Leading Meeting and Conference Centre (Jamaica Conference Centre); Leading Hotel (Sandals Negril Beach Resort); Leading Resort (Sandals Whitehouse) and Leading Spa Resort (Half Moon, Montego Bay), among others.

Hundreds of representatives of the travel and tourism industry from the Caribbean, North, Central and South America attended the event, which is known as the Oscars of tourism.

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, who addressed the gathering, said that Jamaica was proud to be hosting the prestigious awards ceremony for the 17th year, which was testimony to the world class destination that the country had become.

He said that the accolades and recognition from the World Travel Awards, "speak to the excellence and service quality assurance that an international visitor can expect when selecting a destination or travel brand".

"It is well known that once a traveller sees the World Travel Awards symbol, they can be assured of the quality and they will know that they are getting the absolute best. It is a renowned badge of service excellence," he stated.

The Minister credited the achievement to the various stakeholders in the sector, noting that "it is the service quality and a visitor experience that epitomises excellence, which depicts a world class destination and resort. While Jamaica boasts the most diverse and largest number of attractions in the Caribbean, it is the warmth and tenacity of our people that create the winning experience."





Gregory Isaacs' body to be flown home November 11

Webmin
No Comments



The body of international reggae singer Gregory Isaacs will be flown to Jamaica on November 11.

The body will be escorted by his children and grand-children who reside in Britain.

His wife, Linda, who resides in the United Kingdom, says a memorial service will be held in London before the body is returned home.

The UK service is scheduled to held at 2pm on November 10 at the 'All Saints' Church in Harrow Weald, Isaac's London hometown.

Mrs. Isaacs reportedly told RJR News that Culture Minister, Olivia 'Babsy' Grange, has organised an official funeral to be held at the National Arena.

Gregory Isaacs died in London on Monday, October 25, after being diagnosed with lung cancer.





REGGAE MOURNS THE LOSS OF A LEGEND - GREGORY ISAACS

Webmin
5 Comments





Reggae Singer Passes Away in London from Lung Cancer
Gregory Isaacs
[July 15, 1951 - October 25, 2010]


October 25, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(VP RECORDS, NEW YORK) - The reggae community mourns the loss of one of its legends, Gregory Isaacs. Best known for his lovers' rock anthems, the versatile and velvet-voiced crooner was recognized by the international masses for his talent and contribution to music for decades, and remains an icon for the genre.

Isaacs was born on July 15, 1951 in Kingston, Jamaica andgained appeal and acclaim in the 1970s and 1980s for hits such as "Night Nurse" and "Rumors." Nicknamed the 'Cool Ruler' by his fans, Isaacs pioneered his own sound by fusing traditional reggae with dancehall, thereby reinventing the genre and expanding its global fan base into what it is today.

"Gregory Isaacs leaves behind an iconic history and catalog that is unparalleled," reveals VP Records CEO, Christopher Chin. "He devoted his entire life to music and his memory will forever live on with us - through his music and the legacy he leaves behind."

Isaacs fought a year-long battle with lung cancer before passing away on October 25, 2010 at his home in London, at the age of 59. Condolences and prayers go out to his family and loved ones during this trying time.

______________







Dancehall artistes Baby Cham and Bounty Killer who have not recorded together in almost a decade have reunited on a new single from producer Dave Kelly.


The new song is titled Stronger and also features Mykal Rose.
Stronger was released locally this week and is already spreading its wings on mainstream radio stations around the world.


Baby Cham, whose given name is Damian Beckett and Bounty Killer, whose real name is Rodney Price, were close friends in the 1990s but parted ways over unknown disagreements.


The two have reportedly worked out their differences and will also be working together to produce another mega hits like Another Level.
According to reports, Baby Cham is also an official member of the Bounty Killer-led Alliance.








Information released by the police show that the crime rate is trending down.

Between January 1 and September 30 this year, 1,065 murders were recorded, 135 fewer than to the same period last year. In 2008, the total recorded over the same period was 1,241.


The statistics show a 42 per cent dip in murders for the month of September, which saw 77 murders — including that of four children, two women and two cops — being committed in comparison to 132 in September 2009. This is the first time since July 2002 that the monthly tally has dipped below 80.


The gun was the most-used weapon. Fifty-seven persons were shot to death, 12 were killed by knives and three were chopped to death; while five murders were committed with implements listed as 'other'. There were also two drive-by shootings and four double murders last month.


Fatal shootings by the police also declined from 21 in September last year to 12 last month.


Police statistics indicate that 81 persons were shot and injured last month, a 39 per cent drop from the 132 shootings documented in September 2009.


Twelve revolvers, 15 pistols, a submachine gun, one homemade gun and a rifle, a total of 30 guns, were seized last month, 13 less than in September last year. A total of 175 rounds of assorted ammunition were also seized last month.






Allan ‘Skill’ Cole among 10 honoured by JFF

Webmin
No Comments



Former footballer Allan ‘Skill’ Cole were among ten people who were honoured by the JFF for their significant contribution to the development of football in Jamaica. They were honoured at a reception held on the occasion of the visit of the president of the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA), Joseph Sepp Blatter, at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel September 26.

"It is great, great pleasure for me to be with you," said Blatter. "I am grateful now to be with you when awards are being presented to those who have served over the years and all volunteers in this sport."

The awardees were former prime minister and current chairman of the Premier League Clubs' Association, Edward Seaga; former prime minister P.J. Patterson; former St Catherine FA president for 42 years, Lincoln 'Happy' Sutherland; former national footballer and coach, Allan 'Skill' Cole; coach of Seba United, Weston King; football administrator and coach, John Green; former president of Kingston and St Andrew Footbal Association (KSAFA) and former vice-president of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), David 'Billy' Marston; former general secretary of KSAFA and the JFF, Russell Bell; former Trelawny FC president, Neville Glanville; and JFF administrator and Santos coach, Carlton Dennis.

JFF President Captain Horace Burrell pointed out that there are other persons deserving of awards who will be acknowledged in the future.

"There are many others who are quite deserving of awards ... your time will come, don't worry about it," he affirmed. "We are only awarding 10 persons tonight; in the future we will be awarding more."

Cole, who is the youngest player to represent Jamaica at the national level - age 16 - was very pleased to finally be honoured in his own country.

"I lived in Ethiopia for three years and in one season I got a lot of accolades in the country," said Cole. "I have played for Jamaica from I was 16 and just getting an award, so I must cherish and honour it.

"I feel very honoured and it is good to know people recognise what you are doing and you are honoured before you pass away," said Dennis in response to being recognised.





Happy Birthday Daddy Marcus

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica's first National Hero was born in St. Ann's Bay, St. Ann, on August 17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston, where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".


During his career Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries, observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.
In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self-government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects and protest against racial discrimination.
In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.
However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.
Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity, forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections but won a seat on the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC).


But the world of the 1930s was not ready for Garvey's progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.


Garvey's legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught - race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for rulers to govern on behalf of the working classes.







The Cabinet has approved the establishment of a Committee and Secretariat to lead the celebration of Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence in 2012.


The Planning Committee will be drawn from representatives of the private cultural sector; tourism, education, youth, financial, agriculture and mining sectors; as well as the religious community, among other sectors.


The Planning Committee along with the Secretariat which will be housed at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, will be responsible for the planning and implementation of activities toward the Jamaica 50 celebrations including the staging of CARIFESTA as part of Jamaica 50 celebrations.


Minister Grange said:“We want to our jubilee celebrations in 2012 to be the best yet. Jamaica 50 will be memorable. We will celebrate our strengths as a nation as we plan for the future with purpose, faith and confidence.”<


The Secretariat will be supported by the agencies of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, in particular the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission.


Jamaica will celebrate 50 years as an independent nation on August 6, 2012.





BDA1.jpg





Michael Jackson Humanitarian Deeds

Webmin
2 Comments

0023ae606f170b29c7d05d.jpg
April 14, 1984: Michael equips a 19-bed-unit at Mount Senai New York Medical Center. This center is part of the T.J. Martell-Foundation for leukemia and cancer research.



July 5, 1984: During the Jackson's press conference at Tavern On The Green, Michael announces that his part of the earnings from the Victory Tour will be donated to three charitable organizations: The United Negro College Fund, Camp Good Times, and the T.J. Martell-Foundation.



July 14, 1984: After the first concert of the Victory Tour, Michael meets 8 terminally ill children backstage.





Happy Mother’s Day

Webmin
3 Comments

Happy_Mothers_Day.jpg
This Sunday the world over will be celebrating Mother’s Day…but how did it all come about? How come we are now recognizing the significant contribution that mothers have made from creation?



The history of Mother's Day is centuries old and the earliest Mother's Day celebrations can be traced back to the spring celebrations of ancient Greece in honor of Rhea, the Mother of the Gods. During the 1600's, the early Christians in England celebrated a day to honor Mary, the mother of Christ. By a religious order the holiday was later expanded in its scope to include all mothers, and named as the Mothering Sunday. Celebrated on the 4th Sunday of Lent (the 40 day period leading up to Easter), "Mothering Sunday" honored the mothers of England.



In the United States, Mother's Day was loosely inspired by the British day and was first suggested after the American Civil War by social activist Julia Ward Howe. During the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870s, Julia began a one-woman peace crusade and made an impassioned "appeal to womanhood" to rise against war. In 1872, she went to London to promote an international Woman's Peace Congress. She began promoting the idea of a "Mother's Day for Peace" to be celebrated on June 2, honoring peace, motherhood and womanhood. In the Boston Mass, she initiated a Mothers' Peace Day observance on the second Sunday in June, a practice that was to be established as an annual event and practiced for at least 10 years. The day was, however, mainly intended as a call to unite women against war. The celebrations died out when she turned her efforts to working for peace and women's rights in other ways. Howe failed in her attempt to get the formal recognition of a Mother's Day for Peace.





Michael Lee-Chin

Webmin
2 Comments

MichaelLeeChin_188.jpgMichael Lee-Chin was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica to black and Chinese Jamaicans. When Lee-Chin was 7 his mother married Vincent Chen. He attended Titchfield High School between 1962 and 69.

In 1970 he earned a scholarship to study Civil Engineering at McMaster University in Canada. He worked briefly as a road engineer for the Jamaican Government but unable to find a job in his qualified field he returned to Canada.

He had various jobs until he secured a loan in 1983 for C$500,000 from the Continental Bank of Canada and purchased a stake in Mackenzie Financial Group and formed Kicks Athletics with Andrew Gayle which was worth C$3.5 million by 1987.

With these proceeds he bought a Kitchener based company called the Advantage Investment Council for C$200,000. He renamed the company AIC and developed it into a fund that today controls C$6 billion, with hundreds of investors.

He continued to form and acquire companies that deals in investments, securities and insurance through the Berkshire Group of Companies which by 2007 amassed C$12 billion in assets. On October 5, 2006, Lee-Chin announced his resignation fron AIC and was replaced by Johnathan Wellum, AIC's Chief Investment Officer. He remains as AIC's Executive Chairman.





Robert L. Johnson

Webmin
No Comments

robert_johnson.jpgRobert L. Johnson was born in Hickory, Mississippi on April 8, 1946. He was the ninth of ten children born to Edna and Archie Johnson. He studied history at the University of Illinois, where he graduated with a bachelor's degree. He also earned a master's degree in International Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

In 1979 he founded Black Entertainment Television (BET), which was the first cable television aimed at African Americans. It was launched in January 1980, broadcasting for two hours per week.
Presently, BET reaches more than 65 million US homes. It has become the first black-controlled company listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

BET has expanded into other BET -related television channels that encompasses the BET Networks: BETJ, BET Hip Hop and BET Gospel.
In 1998 Johnson made the company private by buying back all of its publicly traded stock. In 1999 Viacom bought BET for $3 billion. Johnson's 63 percent share made him the richest black person (before being usurped by Oprah Winfrey) with assets of a billion dollars after taxes. He continued to be the company's chairman and CEO for six years before turning over the titles of President and Chief Operating Officer of BET to Debra L. Lee a former BET vice president.

Johnson started the RLJ Companies whose goal was to create a holding company and asset management firm run by a minority business person. The RLJ Companies has a diverse portfolio of companies touching on all area of their business industry, ie. real estate, financial service, hospitality, sports, film, automotive and gaming. RLJ has headquarters all across the USA.





Black Uhuru

Webmin
1 Comment

black_uhuru.jpgThe reggae band Black Uhuru was formed by Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson in the 1970's. The band whose name Uhuru is Swahili for freedom was the first group to win a Grammy when the reggae category was introduced in 1985 for the single "What is Life' on the "Anthem'" album.

Over the years the group went through many changes; the first group members were Garth Dennis, Don Carlos and Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson. Then Carlos left and was replaced by Michael Rose, then Dennis left and was replaced by Errol Nelson. During this period the band released its most famous album "Love Crisis" later re-released as "Black Sounds of Freedom". Sandra 'Puma' Jones joined the group in 1979 and with this new line-up; Rose, Simpson and Jones, along with Sly & Robbie as producers and drum and bass players, they release "Sinsemilla", "Red", "Chill Out" and the Grammy winning "Anthem", which were there most popular album.

Black Uhuru became one of the most popular reggae groups in the world touring with super stars such as the Police, the Rolling Stones and the Clash.





Portia Simpson-Miller

Webmin
No Comments

Portia Simpson-Miller.jpgPortia Lucretia Simpson-Miller ON, MP was born on December 12, 1945 in Wood Hall, St. Catherine. She has the distinction of being Jamaica's first female Prime Minister from March 30, 2006 - September 11, 2007. She is presently the President and Leader of the Opposition. She is also a member of the 'Council of Women World Leaders' which is an International network of former and current women presidents and prime ministers whose mission is to mobilize women leaders in a collective effort to take action on issues critical to women and equitable development.
Mrs Simpson-Miller became the third woman to become Prime Minister in the English speaking Caribbean, when she succeeded ongoing Prime Minister P.J. Patterson. She now holds the position as President of the opposition People's National Party.
Prior to being Prime Minister she was the Minister of local Government and Sport since 2002. She has also served as Minister of Labour, Welfare and Sports; Minister of Labour, Social Security and Sports; Minister of Tourism and Sports and Defence Minister.
On September 2007 her party narrowly lost the 2007 general election to the rival Jamaica Labour Party 32 to 28 seats (after recounts). Simpson-Miller initially refused to concede defeat citing unfair voting regulations, but finally conceded when the Organization of American States issued a statement declaring the election free and fair. She was succeeded as Prime Minister by JLP leader Bruce Golding.
In July 2008 she was challenged for the Presidency of the PNP by her rival Dr. Peter Phillips. The election was held among the party's delegates on September 20, 2008. She defeated Phillips by an even wider margin than that of the previous election.
Simpson-Miller holds a Bachelor of Arts in public administration from the Union Institute, who also gave her an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters.
She is married to the Most Honorable Errald Miller, former CEO of Cable & Wireless Jamaica Limited.
She was invested with the Jamaican O





Merlene Joyce Ottey

Webmin
3 Comments

Merlene Joyce Ottey.jpgMerlene Joyce Ottey was born on May 10, 1960 in Cold Spring, Hanover, Jamaica to Hubert and Joan Ottey. She was introduced to track & field by her mother.
Ottey attended Gurnrys Mount and Pondside Schools, Ruseas and Vere Technical high schools, where she competed in barefooted races.
Ottey was inspired by listening to track & field broadcasts of the 1976 Summer Olympics. Her athletic career took off while attending University of Nebraska in the USA in 1979.
Over time Ottey won many awards: In 1982 she won the gold medal in the 200m and silver in the 100m at the 1982 Commonwealth Games.
In the 1990 Commonwealth Games she won gold in both events. She was named Ambassador of Jamaica for the Year 15 times between 1979 - 1997.
In total, Ottey has won right Olympic medals, but never an Olympic gold. She has to her credit three silver and five bronze medals which earned her the nickname "The Bronze Queen". She also has won 14 World Championship medals between 1983 - 1997- more than any other althete, male or female.
On 1999 a banned substance was descovered in her urine and she was banned from competing in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia. She also pulled out of the World Championships as she strove to clear her name, which she eventually did by the summer of that year in time to be selected to compete in the Olympic games.
She ran fourth in the controversial race and vowed that even though she could still run at 40 she would not run for Jamaica anymore as she felt as they were trying to push her out of the sport.





Arthur Wint - Jamaica's first Olympic gold medalist

Webmin
No Comments

arthur_wint.jpgArthur Wint was born in Plowden, Manchester, Jamaica on May 3, 1920. He was the Jamaican Boy Athlete of the Year in 1937, he won a gold medal in the 800m at the Central American Games in Panama.

He joined the Royal Air Force and while undergoing training in Canada he set the 400m record. After taking part in active duty as a pilot in WWii he left the Air Force in 1947 to attend medical school at St. Bartholomews Hospital.

In 1948 he won Jamaica's fist gold medal for the 400m (46.2) in London beating team mate Herb McKenley. He also won the silver medal in the 800m.

Wint was also part of the historic relay team, in Helsinki's 1952 games, where they set the world record and captured the gold medal in the 4 X 400m relay. He also once again won siver in the 800m.

Arthur Wint ran his final race in 1953 at Wembley Stadium, completed his internship, graduated as a doctor and was made a Member of the British Empire (MBE) by Queen Elizabeth the following year.





Oprah Winfrey

Webmin
4 Comments

oprah_winfrey.jpgOprah Gail Winfrey was born January 29, 1954 in Kosciusko, Mississippi. She escaped a troubled childhood living with her mother where she was repeatedly sexually abused by male family members and friends, to live with her father in Nashville.
She attended Tennessee State University in 1971 and began working in radio and television.
In 1976 Oprah moved to Baltimore where she hosted the TV talk show, "People are Talking", the show was a hit and Oprah stayed with it for eight years. Her success led her to Stephen Speilberg's 1985 film "The Color Purple" for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.
She launched the Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. The show was such a success that she gained ownership of it from ABC and placed it under the control of her production company Harpo Productions and made more money from syndications. Her show free of tabloid topics earned her the respect and popularity of her viewers.
Harpo has undertaken many projects, one being the production of the 1989 miniseries "The Women of Brewsters Palce" which Oprah also starred in.
Oprah well known for her constant struggle with her weight is also known for the launching of "Oprah's Book Club" as part of her talk show. This is where novels are introduced, read and discussed on air.
Oprah has the distinction of being one of the most powerful and wealthy people in show business. According to Forbes Magazine, Oprah is the richest African American of the 20th century and the world's only black billionaire 3 years running.





Malcom X

Webmin
1 Comment

malcom x.jpgMalcolm Little (Malcolm X) was born in Omaha, nebraska, USA on May 19, 1925.
As a teenager he was involved in pimping and drugs. In 1946 he was arrested, charged and sentenced to ten years in prison for burglary. While in prison he discovered the anti-white Black Muslims.
In 1952 Malcolm joined the Muslims and became a recruiter, changed his name and began writing. He became well known for his 1959 television documentary. Both his writings and his documentary portrayed him as a threat to white people.
After breaking from the Muslims in 1964 he founded the Muslim Mosque in an effort to internationalize the Afro-American struggle. He travelled to Muslim lands and was impressed with their lack of racial bias. He became convinced that whites were not all born inherently racist. He once again re-invented himself and called himself El-Haff Malik El Shabazz and formed the Organisation of African American Unity in hopes of co-operating with progressive white groups.
Malcolm influenced the movements of black power and neo-colonialism by transforming the consciousness of generations of African-Americans.
He was assassinated in New York City in 1965, and it was believed that members of the Nation of Islam were involved.





Louis Armstrong

Webmin
No Comments

lois-armstrong.jpgLouis Armstrong born on August 4, 1901 in New Orleans, Louisiana USA was one of the leading trumpeters and most influential jazz artistes of his time.
Armstrong grew up poor and did odd jobs while listening to jazz music and singing in a boys' quartet. While spending time in Waifs Home for coloured juvenile delinquents (1913) he learned to play cornet in the home's band. Music quickly became his passion and in his teens he quickly learned more about music by listening to jazz musicians such as King Oliver. He became skilled and was soon playing in jazz bands and even replaced Oliver in the Kid Ory Band (1918), and played in Mississippi riverboat dance bands during the early 20's.
Oliver invited Armstrong to play second cornet in his Creole Jazz Band which included outstanding musicians such as Johnny and Baby Dodds and pianist Lil Hardin who he later married in 1924.
Armstrong recorded his first soloist pieces "Chimes Blues" and "Tears" which he produced with his wife.
Lil encouraged Armstrong to quit Oliver's band and he played in Fletcher Henderson's band in New York for a year before returning to Chicago to play in large orchestras. There he created his most important works - The Armstrong Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings of 1925 - 1928 which made him the first jazz soloist. He recorded solo pieces such as "Hotter than That", "Struttin' with some Barbecue" among others. By this time Armstrong was playing trumpet and his style was far superior to that of his competitors.





Maya Angelou

Webmin
9 Comments

maya_angelou.jpgMaya Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. Both she and her brother, Bailey, were sent to live with their grandmother in rural Stamps, Arkansas when their parents separated.
During a visit to her mother in St. Louis Maya Angelou was raped by her mother's boyfriend - she was eight. She later testified against the man, who was beaten to death by her uncles. Blaming herself for his death, Maya refused to speak for five years.
She attended high schools in both Arkansas and California and was the first African American female streetcar conductor in San Francisco, California.
She gave birth to a son at 16 and later married Tosh Angelos in 1950. They soon separated.
Maya Angelou studied drama and dance and went on to perform in theatre where she appeared in "Porgy and Bess" and "Cabaret for Freedom" which she co-wrote with Godfrey Cambridge.
During the 1960's she moved to Cairo, Egypt where she worked as the associate editor of the Arab Observer. She also contributed articles to The Ghanaian Times and was featured on the Ghanaian Broadcasting Corporation programming Accra, Ghana. During the 1960's she was also the Assistant administrator of the School of Music and Drama at the University of Ghana. She was also the feature editor of the African Review in Accra from 1964-1966. Upon her return to the USA civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requested that she serve as northern coordinator for Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
She wrote her first autobiographical novel " I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings" in 1970, which tells of her life up to the age of sixteen.





The "doctress" Mary Seacole

Webmin
1 Comment

487px-Mary_Seacole_Drawing.jpgMary Seacole, born in Kingston in 1805 to a Scottish army officer and a free black woman who not only nursed the sick, ran a boarding house but who also taught her daughter about the healing properties of herbal medicine.

Mary Seacole, using herbal medicine, played a pivotal role in not only the 1850 cholera epidemic but also the yellow fever outbreak in Jamaica. As her notoriety grew she was soon performing operations on persons suffering from gunshot and knife wounds.

From her travels across the Caribbean, Mary Seacole increased her knowledge of how people used local plants and herbs to treat the sick. She also treated persons afflicted with cholera in Panama. Mary learnt more about how the cholera disease attacked the body by performing an autopsy on one of its victims.

When soldiers of the Crimean War began to suffer from cholera and malaria, Mary went to London to offer her help and expertise but was rejected due to prejudice against women performing medicine. However, when the government was forced to change their minds they enlisted the less skilled Florence Nightingale along with a team of thirty-nine nurses. Mary's application to join Florence Nightingale's team was denied.

A successful business woman at the time, Mary travelled to Crimea at her own expense. She visited Florence Nightingale to offer her services but was once again turned down.





Independence Day of Jamaica

Webmin
6 Comments

The Spanish and the English rule

The Spanish settlers moved to Villa de la Vega, now known as Spanish Town, establishing it as the capital of Jamaica. The 1640s saw many people coming to Jamaica for its stunning beauty; especially the pirates who had a reputation of deserting their raiding parties and staying on in the island. The attacks by the pirates in Jamaican history can be traced back to nearly 100 years, between 1555 and 1655; the final attack leaving the island in the hands of the English.

The island of Jamaica was finally seized by the British forces in the form of a joint expedition by Admiral Sir William Penn and General Robert Venables in May 1655. The buccaneers were invited by the Governor to form their base at Port Royal to prevent Spanish aggression in 1657. The Spanish were defeated in the successive battles that followed, starting the extended reign of the British on Jamaican soil. Through the Treaty of Madrid in 1670, the British gained formal recognition of possession of Jamaica. Still part of the Island remained in the hands of some of the escaped slaves called the 'Maroons', with whom they signed a treaty on March 1, 1738. Even though much of the Spanish capital, Villa de la Vega, was burned during the English conquest, they renamed it Spanish Town and kept it as the island's capital.





Information on Emancipation Day

Webmin
2 Comments

The Road to Freedom

The day was August 1, the year 1838 and the event, Emancipation from Slavery. Tears of joy flowed incessantly, while shouts of freedom rang from the mountain tops and the plains, from the men, women and children, who had learnt that they were finally free of the oppressive social and economic system in which they were treated as less than human.

From its introduction in the West Indies in 15th Century, slavery was regarded by many as immoral and brutish, characterized by the destruction of the "innate characteristics of humankind, which are necessary for progress." The slave-owning class, who dominated the legislative system, drew up the slave laws, which were rigid. Some of these laws and punishments included forbidding slaves to hold meetings without permission from or under the supervision of a white person. Slaves were banned from beating drums and blowing horns as it was thought to be a signal of rebellion and they were severely beaten for slowing down in the fields.

The Quakers, a religious group, were among the first critics of the system and campaigned for its abolition. The campaign was led by Granville Sharpe, an English man who was successful in securing the freedom of an abandoned slave, Joseph Strong, in England 1787. The Quakers formed the 'Society For Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade' and others such as Sharpe, Thomas Clarkson, James Ramsey and Edmond Burke then joined it.

They argued that not only was slavery against the will of God, but was also the denial of civilization. They said that freedom was the true, natural state of man. However, their arguments proved futile as the sugar industry was booming.

Persons in favour of the system expressed the view that blacks were unprepared for freedom and would be harmed by it, and that not all men were born free and equal. They also held the view that Africans were different from whites and thus should be treated as animals.

It was not until the eighteenth century when the sugar industry began to decline that the anti-slavery movement received encouragement. The first victory for the abolitionist came in March of 1807, with the passage of the Bill for 'The Total and Immediate Abolition of the Slave Trade' in the British Parliament.

But, to a large extent, it was the slaves themselves who charted the course to their own freedom, by the many brutal revolts staged across the island. They had the help of the Maroons, those slaves who had escaped into the island's mountains. The most famous revolt was the 1831 "Christmas" or "Baptist War".

These rebellions, coupled with the decline in the sugar, caused a drain on the planters' coffers. With the possibility of a general uprising constantly threatening, the law to abolish slavery was once again proposed in the British Parliament in 1833 and this time was passed with little resistance.





edit-mikey-dread_dead.jpgA memorial service will be held this Saturday in Portland, Jamaica for the late television presenter, top radio personality, record producer and artist.


1976-1979

Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation in Kingston, Jamaica - Presenter: "Dread at the Controls Show" Technical Operator: Audio programs both live and recorded.

Awarded: Top Radio Personality in Jamaican Radio based on the unusual impact made on radio listeners and the popularity of recordings made.

Recorded/produced single: "Barber Saloon." Charted at number one on the local radio charts recorded several Top 10-reggae singles.

Performed live at Reggae Sunsplash in Jamaica along with other featured artists including Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Inner Circle, and Third World.

Produced first album "Dread at the Controls" (Trojan Records-London) and "African Anthem" (A Special Edition from Jamaica's radio program for Cruise Records-UK).

Worked at Treasure Isle Recording Studio-Jamaica as Audio Engineer.

Traveled to London on a promotional trip.





G.Stiebelpict2.jpgThere was every indication at a very early stage that George Stiebel was destined to lead an intriguing life. Born to a Jamaican housekeeper, and a German Jew in the 1820s, George was subject to a range of criticisms and harsh treatment from his peers as a result of his mixed parentage. School was therefore not as fulfilling an experience as it should have been, and he quit the classroom at age fourteen to become a carpenter’s apprentice. George quickly developed a flair for carpentry, and by age 19 he played an integral role in the reconstruction of the famous Ferry Inn, between Kingston and Spanish Town.

In the 1840's, George's father gave him start up capital to purchase a ship, which he began using to transport cargo between North and South America. Shortly after he purchased two additional ships to develop his new business venture in the Caribbean, including Cuba where a revolution was in high gear. He realized that the island would be ideal to undertake a lucrative gun-trading ring. While he did manage to make respectable profits from trading guns, he also fell in trouble with the law for his activities.

In 1851, George's life took a turn for the better when he married long time sweetheart Magdalene Baker, daughter of a Moravian Missionary. Soon after their son, Sigismund, named after George's father, was born. Two years later a girl, Theresa, joined the Stiebel family. Five years after their marriage, his ships were caught in a terrible storm, which destroyed the vessels. Unfortunately Stiebel was aboard one of the ships which sank off the coast of Venezuela. He managed to survive the wreckage and luckily he had the foresight to secure all his money which was stored in a leather belt. Stiebel's tenacity soon began to show results, because shortly after arriving in Venezuela he became a peddler, and with his savings he purchased a mule to assist in transporting his goods. His misfortune at sea quickly dulled when he began trading gold in Venezuela. He invested in a gold mine with his friends, and fifteen years later in 1873 the business was showing huge profits. George Stiebel had undoubtedly made an impressive stake in the gold mining business and the accolade awarded to him as Jamaica's first millionaire of African descend seemed very deserving and appropriate. His achievements were shattered however with the death of his son, and he returned home to Jamaica.





Booker T Washington – a life worth emulating

Webmin
6 Comments

booker_t_washington.jpgFor all those who have the opportunity of going to school and are procrastinating then read the story of Booker T Washington. Imagine having to walk 200 miles to get an education! His life should inspire us to forget about the minor irritations and really get focused on making more of our lives!

(1856-1915) - Lecturer, Civil Rights/Human Rights Activist, Educational Administrator, Professor, Organization Executive/Founder, Author/Poet.

Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hale's Ford, Virginia, reportedly on April 5, 1856. After emancipation, his family was so poverty stricken that he worked in salt furnaces and coal mines beginning at age nine. Always an intelligent and curious child, he yearned for an education and was frustrated when he could not receive good schooling locally. When he was 16 his parents allowed him to quit work to go to school. They had no money to help him, so he walked 200 miles to attend the Hampton Institute in Virginia and paid his tuition and board there by working as the janitor.





Garrett Morgan – inventor extraordinaire

Webmin
7 Comments

GarrettMorgan.jpgMost people hearing the name Garrett Morgan can associate it with he being the man who invented the traffic light – but his work goes far beyond that. He also designed the first gas mask for use by firefighters, too.

Garrett Augustus Morgan was born on March 4, 1877 in Paris, Kentucky. He was the seventh of eleven children, and he spent his childhood working on their farm and attending elementary school.

At the age of 14 Garrett Morgan moved to Cincinnati, Ohio and hired a tutor so he could continue his English grammar studies. Garrett moved again in 1895, this time to Cleveland, Ohio and went to work for a clothing manufacturer as a repairman for the sewing machines. He did such a good job that news of his proficiency and experimentation spread quickly around town, and many job offers came pouring in.

In 1909, he had already opened his own tailoring shop when he came upon an interesting situation that led to the first of his famous inventions. Garrett noticed that the needles moved so fast through the wool fabrics, that the friction often caused them to scorch the fabric. He decided to try to come up with a liquid to polish the needles and reduce the friction. One day, when his wife called him for dinner, he wiped the liquid from his hands onto a pony-fur cloth to clean them. When he returned after dinner, he noticed that the fibers were standing up straight now. He thought that the liquid must have straightened them. He decided to test this theory by applying the liquid to the fur of his neighbor's dog, which was an Airedale.





Harriet Tubman – The Black Moses of her people

Webmin
5 Comments

harriet_tubman.jpgMartin Luther King, Malcolm X and others have dominated when it comes to imparting the achievements of blacks...but not enough is sung about Araminta Ross aka Harriet Tubman. Many often refer to her as 'the Moses of her people.' Get familiar with her inspiring story.

Born around 1820 in Bucktown, Maryland. Reared in slavery, she married a free black, John Tubman, in 1844. He opposed her plans to flee north, so she escaped alone via the Underground Railroad in 1849, and over the next decade she led nearly 300 Maryland slaves to safety, including several siblings and her elderly parents.

Harriet was a deeply devoutly religious woman and a believer in decisive action. She helped John Brown organize his 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia, but was prevented by illness from accompanying him. During the Civil War she repeatedly went behind enemy lines to spy for the Union, and recruit slaves to fight in the army.

In her later years, living in Auburn, New York, she helped support relatives and other former slaves, and raised money for freedmen's schools and a home for elderly blacks.

While Harriet Tubman remains one of history's best-known African Americans, until recently there have been few biographies of her written for adults. Because her life is inspiring, there are appropriately many children's stories about Tubman, but these tend to stress her early life, her own escape from slavery, and her work with the Underground Railroad. Less well known and neglected by many historians are her Civil War service and her activities in the nearly 50 years she lived after the Civil War ended. In this article, you'll find details about Harriet Tubman's life in slavery and her work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, but you'll also find information about Tubman's later and less-known work and life.





THE HISTORY OF VALENTINE'S DAY

Webmin
18 Comments

red-cupid.jpgValentine's Day started in the time of the Roman Empire. In ancient Rome, February 14th was a holiday to honor Juno. Juno was the Queen of the Roman Gods and Goddesses. The Romans also knew her as the Goddess of women and marriage. The following day, February 15th, began the Feast of Lupercalia.

The lives of young boys and girls were strictly separate. However, one of the customs of the young people was name drawing. On the eve of the festival of Lupercalia, the names of Roman girls were written on slips of paper and placed into jars. Each young man would draw a girl's name from the jar and would then be partners for the duration of the festival with the girl whom he chose. Sometimes the pairing of the children lasted an entire year, and often, they would fall in love and would later marry.

Under the rule of Emperor Claudius II, Rome was involved in many bloody and unpopular campaigns. Claudius the Cruel was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. He believed that the reason was that Roman men did not want to leave their loves or families. As a result, Claudius canceled all marriages and engagements in Rome.





Bob Marley – The man and his music

Webmin
11 Comments

By: Kemesha Bolton

BOBMARLEY.jpgIn highlighting the legend that has surpassed all expectation and given us all a sense of who we are; we celebrate his birth, music and his death on this day his Earthstrong.


HIS BIRTH

There was no event which took place during the early hours of the morning in rural St. Ann, Jamaica when newly wed, nineteen year old Cedella Malcolm-Marley gave birth to her first child.

The 'moon faced' Cedella suffered greatly from morning sickness. When she went into labour on Sunday evening, she was taken to the house of her father, Omeriah Malcolm. She remained in labour through all of Monday; then at 2:30 the following morning Robert Nesta was finally delivered: a fawn colored boy with nose of his father Captain Norval Sinclair Marley.

Just after sunrise the after birth was wrapped carefully in a page from the Gleaner that contained a story describing the arrest in Kingston the day before of a young rude boy who had stolen 35 pounds from a Chinaman. The Hooligans alias was Pearl Harbor.

The after birth was buried at the foot of a young mango sapling that would from that day forth be Nesta's 'frenly tree', it would grow as tall and as strong as he wished it to, it's health and height reflecting his care; it would bend with the passage of time in the same direction as its cultivator.





In the beginning was Reggae!

Webmin
4 Comments

reggae ramp halspark.jpgThe word "reggae" was coined around 1960 in Jamaica to identify a "ragged" style of dance music, that still had its roots in New Orleans rhythm'n'blues.

However, reggae soon acquired the lament-like style of chanting and emphasized the syncopated beat. It also made explicit the relationship with the underworld of the "Rastafarians" (adepts of a millenary African faith, revived Marcus Garvey who advocated a mass emigration back to Africa), both in the lyrics and in the appropriation of the African nyah-bingi drumming style (a style that mimicks the heartbeat with its pattern of "thump-thump, pause, thump-thump").

Compared with rock music, reggae music basically inverted the role of bass and guitar: the former was the lead, the latter beat the typical hiccupping pattern. The paradox of reggae, of course, is that this music "unique to Jamaica" is actually not Jamaican at all, having its foundations in the USA and Africa.





Influences of Blacks on the world

Webmin
4 Comments

carver_george1.jpgAs we celebrate black history month you can't help but reflect on the great contributions blacks made in making life better for all.

YardFlex in celebration of Black History Month will be featuring some outstanding black luminaries throughout the month.

We start off with George Washington Carver one of the most famous black inventor in history.

His contributions to the world in the areas of agriculture have influenced the economy and provided us with great products ranging from peanut butter to colors for our clothing.

George Washington Carver was born on July 12, 1864 in Diamond Grove, Missouri. He was a sickly child who would remain that way for the majority of his childhood years. He and his mother lived on a farm owned by Moses and Susan Carver, when they were kidnapped during a raid one night. Days later, neighbors found George and returned him to the Carvers, but now he had contracted whooping cough. His mother was nowhere to be found, so the Carver family raised him as their own.

Because of his poor health, George Washington Carver was not able to help out by working in the fields, but he did have a great interest in plants, and even planted his own garden in the woods near their farm. He produced medicines for his family and was soon given the nicknamed, 'The Plant Doctor.'

George was unable to get into any schools until he was 12, due to his race. To get into first formal school, he had to move to Newton County, Missouri and leave his adoptive parents behind, because there were no black schools any closer. He worked on a farm to earn money for his education in a one-room schoolhouse. Shortly afterward, he moved with another family to Fort Scott, Kansas.

When it was time to move on and continue his education at the University level, George Washington Carver again ran into resistance because of the color of his skin. After being denied entrance into Highland University, he was accepted into Simpson College in Iowa in the year 1890. George was very talented in Art, and earned great respect for that, but his passion was in Science and Agriculture. He transferred to the Iowa Agricultural College, which is now known as Iowa State University, and graduated in 1894. Upon graduation, Carver was offered a position on the faculty and allowed great freedom in the school's greenhouses to pursue his agricultural work. He was the first African American to be offered a faculty position at that College.

In 1896, George Washington Carver received his Master's Degree in Agriculture having co-authored a series of papers on the cures for fungus diseases. In 1897, he discovered two new fungi that were later named after him.

Booker T. Washington convinced George to come down to the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to serve as the Director of Agriculture in 1897.





Oh we miss the Israelite!

Webmin
3 Comments

music-dvd-a-dekker.jpgDesmond Dekker thrilled the world with his ska-laced songs and without a doubt when he died on May 25, 2006 he left a rich legacy of songs that can never be forgotten.

Desmond was the first musician who carried the music from his home Jamaica to the rest of the world. He is considered one of the ancestors of ska. YardFlex take time out to salute the man who made his contribution to the genre.

Desmond Dacres was born in 1942 in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of 19 he met the influential Leslie Kong and who would have supposed that by now a new legend was born? In 1963, the newly named Dekker released his first single, "Honor Your Father And Mother," which was also issued in the UK courtesy of Chris Blackwell's Island label. During the same period, Dekker teamed up with his backing group, the Aces. Together they enjoyed enormous success in Jamaica during the mid-late 60's with a formidable run of 20 number 1 hits to their credit.

The emergence of rocksready in the latter half of 1966 propelled his James Bond inspired "007 (Shanty Town)" into the UK charts the following year. Also the single presaged Dekker's emergence as an
internationally famous artist. 1969 proved the year of Dekker's greatest worldwide success. "Get up in the morning, slaving for bread, sir, so that every mouth can be fed", was a patois-sung opening line which entranced and confused pop listeners on both sides of the Atlantic. The intriguing "Israelites" was a club hit the previous year and by the spring of 1969 had become the first reggae song to top the UK charts ever!





Remembering Dennis Brown

Webmin
12 Comments

dennis_brown.jpgJuly 1, 1999 will be a day remembered by lovers of good reggae music...it's the day when one of the greatest Reggae crooners – Dennis Brown made his exit from the world.

At age 42, he was definitely a life cut short way too soon. Yet in that span he managed to leave the world a rich legacy of feel good songs that decades from now will still be hot.

In a career that spanned almost 4 decades, Dennis worked with many of reggae's top names, beginning with Coxsone Dodd at Studio One, going on to work with such artistes and producers as Winston (Niney) Holness, Joe Gibbs, Derrick Harriott, Herman Chin-Loy, Sidney Crooks, Prince Buster, Randy's, Phil Pratt and GG Ranglin. The list goes on with Clive Hunt and Willie Lindo, engineer Errol Thompson, Sly & Robbie, Gussie Clarke, Tad Dawkins, Trevor Bow, Bunny Lee and Delroy Wright.

Dennis Emanuel Brown was born on February 1, 1957 in Kingston, Jamaica. Regularly billed as "The Crown Prince Of Reggae', it was only Brown's self-effacing nature that denied him advancement to the office of king. Loved in reggae music like no other singer, Brown was regularly courted by the major record labels, and even enjoyed a couple of token chart hits in Britain. More to the point, he produced more reggae classics than just about anyone else. Beginning his career at the age of 9 as one of the Studio One label's many child stars, his first hit, "No Man Is An Island" (1969), found him singing in much the same style he was to use throughout his career, only with a far less croaky voice.

"If I Follow My Heart", another major hit at Studio One, was every bit as good. He spent the early 70s freelancing between studios, recording for Lloyd Daley, Impact, Joe Gibbs and Aquarius, before recording his third collection, "Super Reggae And Soul Hits," a mature, classic record, full of Derrick Harriott's soulful arrangements and Brown's rich tones. A move to Winston "Niney" Holness' label was no less profitable. The two albums he made there, "Just Dennis" and "Wolf & Leopards," were recorded three years apart but their seamless rootsy artistry made them clearly part of one body of work.

A long, fruitful liaison with Joe Gibbs and Errol Thompson resulted in a further series of classic albums, among them "Visions," "Joseph's Coat Of Many Colours," "Spellbound" and "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow." While the rock critics were latching on to dub in the mid-70s, it was Brown who was drawing a mass audience almost unnoticed outside reggae's heartlands.





Ross Kemp looks at the gang violence in Kingston, Jamaica and examines the political history involved...





The Origins of Black History Month

Webmin
3 Comments

carter_g_woodson.jpgIn 1926, Negro History Week was established to honor the accomplishments of African Americans. Carter G. Woodson, a black historian known as the Father of Black History, as well as others proposed the observance. During the 1970s, the observance became known as Black History Week.

In 1976, Black History Month was established. Black History Month is observed each year in February. It coincides with the birthdays of the great black leader Frederick Douglass (February 14) and Abraham Lincoln (February 12).

The celebration is sponsored by the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History in Washington, DC, which Woodson founded in 1915.





selassie.jpgNational Geographic reported that in 1930, as the dawn cleared in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on November 2, it met everyone getting ready for the special historical event to take place that morning - The Coronation of The Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah.

Together with his Empress, His Imperial Majesty, Haile Selassie I spent the night before in prayer and devotion at the most high alter. During the morning chanting of praises resonated and dancing priests with pulsating drum rhythms joined in. Ancient Jewish rites which were in use at the time of King David, were re-lived right there before the ark of the covenant, the report stated. The Coptic Church in all its impressive might and splendor evoked biblical rituals that seemed to roll the centuries back.

As the time came for this coronation, which is the most important event in the Rastafarian Calendar today, His Imperial Majesty entered the ceremonial hall attired in white silk. He was escorted by aides and clergy and was preceded by waving incense burners.





Happy Heroes Day - Oct 15, 2007

Webmin
6 Comments

Jamaica celebrates yet another Heroes Day and in honour Yardflex pay tribute to the many who have laid the foundation that we can now enjoy true freedom. To the many unsung heroes whose work will not make it in the history books, to those who are still working behind the scenes making a difference in their own way.

Yardflex now take a brief look at our seven national heroes...they may be gone, but their work will be ringing out in the ages to come.

Garvey1.jpgMarcus Garvey
Marcus Mosiah Garvey stands out in history as one who was greatly committed to the concept of the Emancipation of minds. He sought the unification of all Blacks through the establishment of the United Negro Improvement Association and spoke out against economic exploitation and cultural denigration.

Jamaica's first national hero was born in Saint Ann's Bay on August17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".
During his career Marcus Garvey traveled extensively throughout many countries observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects; protest against racial discrimination and cultural activities.

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country. He spent many years in the United States pursuing his goal of Black Unification. However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections. The world of the thirties was not ready for Marcus Garvey’s progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.





Enkutatash (New Year) September 8, 2007

Webmin
4 Comments

sis carol.jpglivity ras poet.jpg
tarrus riley livity1.jpg
The Ethiopian New Year falls in September at the end of the big rains. The highlands turn to gold as the Meskel daisies burst out in all their splendor. Ethiopian children clad in brand new clothes dance through the villages giving bouquets of flowers and painted pictures to each household. September 11th is both New Year's Day and the Feast of St. John the Baptist.

The day is called Enkutatash meaning the "gift of jewels." When the famous Queen of Sheba returned from her expensive jaunt to visit King Solomon in Jerusalem, her chiefs welcomed her back by replenishing her treasury with enku or jewels. The spring festival has been celebrated since these early times and as the rains come to their abrupt end, dancing and singing can be heard at every village in the green countryside. After dark on New Year's Eve people light fires outside their houses.





Ethiopia.gifPrime Minister Meles Zenawi.jpg
On September 11, 2007 at midnight in Ethiopia, the New Year and New Millennium celebrations began amid lavish gatherings, religious zeal and positive messages from the country’s troubled government. Ethiopia and Ethiopians throughout the world marked this day with immense enthusiasm and will continue to celebrate for days to come.

In the 6th Century, the rest of the Christian world made revisions in its estimate of the date of Christ’s birth - but Ethiopia kept the old date, which means that 7 years after the rest of the world, the country is marking the start of the year 2000.

For Rastafarians worldwide, recognizing and aligning with the calendar of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Ethiopia (a unique slightly modified Julian calendar) has been a part of their lifestyle and today Rastas everywhere have begun to commemorate the beginning of the year 2000.





Caribbean Day Parade 2007 Largest in History

Webmin
7 Comments

parade.jpgparade 2.jpg
Eastern Parkway in Brookly, New York was the scene of great revelry as another Caribbean Day Parade was held. The Labour Day weekend has historically been a day of heavy feting for national of the Caribbean regions and their friends. Most prominent at the annual West Indian Caribbean day parade were Haitians and Trinidadians who displayed a joint float promoting their Christian faith. The float expressed the sentiments of many in attendance with its prophetic message - "Start to pray today, because you may not be here tomorrow."

There were an estimated one million people in attendance at the parade. Despite the prayer message displayed on the float, at least one person's prayers went unanswered as he became the lone reported casualty of the day. At around 4:00 p.m., gunshots rang out in excess at Troy Avenue, which left one 26 year-old man injured with two gun shots to his leg. The injuries are considered non-life threatening.





The Marcus Garvey Story

Webmin
5 Comments





Tifa and Popcaan win big at YVA's

Webmin
No Comments
tifa-and-popcaan.jpg

The fifth staging of the Youth View Awards show took place at the National Indoor Sports Centre on Saturday night. Celebs walked the Red Carpet and then went inside to hear the list of winners.

Dancehall artiste Tifa was the big winner of the night. Tifa was nominated in 8 categories and walked away with 6 awards. Among the awards were: Best Female Artiste, Best Music Video (a collaboration with Wayne Marshall and Fambo), Young,Hot and Hype female of the Year, Favorite Female Dancehall artiste, Female Fashion Icon and Favorite Collaboration for the song 'Swaggin' WTF' with Wayne Marshall and Fambo.

Popcaan was also a big winner as he walked away with 3 awards: Young, Hot and Hype Male of the Year, Best Summer Song for 'Raving' and Local Chart Topping song of the Year for 'Raving'. The event was hosted by Tami Chynn and Kruddy and the audience was treated to performances from: I Octane, Chris Martin, Tifa, Wayne Marshall, Fambo and Ikaya who did a superb tribute to Bob Marley.




Bob Marley: The Legend Lives On

Webmin
1 Comment
bob-marley.jpg
Bob Marley was born on Feb 6th, 1945, in St. Ann. His mom at the time was an 18 year old Jamaican native, and his dad was a 50 year old white navel captain. The couple got married in 1944 a year before Bob was born. In 1950 Marley moved to Trench Town - Kingston. After Marley dropped out of school he became interested in music. In early 1962 Bob Marley, Bunny Livingston, Peter McIntosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso and Cherry Smith formed a ska & rocksteady group called "The Teenager" which later became The Wailing Rudeboys it was changed again to The Wailing Wailers and eventually became The Wailers . 

Bob Marley has been a great influence in the lives of many present day musical artists and other performers. He grew up listening to the legendary Fats Domino, Ray Charles, Curtis Mayfield, the Drifters and Louis Jordan. 

Bob Marley would put his first record out on wax in February of 1962, the song was called "Judge not." When it came out it was an instant hit locally, but his international fame would not spread for a couple of years.

In 1969, the Wailers first tape was recorded, they were sent to England and released on Trojan records, it was Bob Marley and the Wailers first album and was titled 'Soul Rebels'. This album was only released in Jamaica and England and sold well. titled 'Exodus'

In 1976 'Rastaman Vibrations' was released and the album made its way on to  the American charts.  In December of 1976, an Assassination attempt took place at his house and Marley was shot. Another album was released and stayed on the European charts for 56 weeks.

In May of 1977 during the Exodus tour he was playing football and injured his toe. The injury never healed, and he never got it treated and continued on his tour. 

Marley's last concert would be in Pittsburgh on Sept. 23, 1980 at the Stanley Theater. He would undergo many different treatments to keep him alive longer, but on May 11th, 1981, Bob Marley died at the age of 36 from cancer. 

Although Bob has been dead for years, his music lives on through his sons: Stephen, Ziggy, Julian and Kymani.  Bob Marley not only was one of the greatest musicians in the history of music, he is also one of the greatest men in the history of the world, through his music he not only touched the lives of his fellow countrymen and he has influenced the lifestyles, attitudes and feelings of people all over the world.





BLACK HISTORY MONTH Feature: Nanny of the Maroons

Webmin
No Comments
nanny-of-the-maroons.jpg
Nanny, also called Nanny of the Maroons and Queen Nanny, was a leader of the Maroons in Jamaica. The Maroons were considered defiant Jamaican slaves who fled from the oppressive plantations and formed their own community in the hills. Nanny and her brothers: Accompong, Cudjoe, Johhny and Quao ran away from their plantation and lived in the Blue Mountain areas.

By 1720, Nanny and Quao had settled and controlled an area in the Blue Mountains. As a revolt leader, Nanny aided in the defeat of the British army in several battles. Nanny organized plans to free slaves and was very successful in doing this. Over a 5o year span, Nanny has been credited with freeing over 800 slaves. She also kept the slaves healthy due to her vast knowledge of herbs and her role as a spiritual leader.

The community in which Nanny settled was given the name Nanny Town and consisted of 500 acres of land granted to the runaway slaves. Nanny is one of the earliest leaders of slave resistance and one of the very few women.

The government of Jamaica declared Nanny a National Heroine in 1976. Her portrait graces the $500 Jamaican dollar bill.




Dennis Brown tribute to start Reggae Month

Webmin
No Comments
dennis-brown.jpg
Reggae Month kicks off next month, and with Jamaica celebrating 50 years, plans are well underway for this year's staging.

The Jamaica Reggae Industry Association (JaRIA) has met with Damian Crawford, Minister of State in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment and Lisa Hannah, Minister of Youth and Culture. Crawford assured JaRIA that the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) would be partnering with them to stage Reggae Month with a sponsorship of $4million. 

Under the theme Reggae 50 ... Jamaica's Heart and Soul, Reggae Month will kick off with the staging of the Dennis Brown Tribute Concert which will feature artistes such as Damian and Stephen Marley, Tarrus Riley, Cocoa Tea, Half Pint, Ken Boothe, Junior Reid and Beres Hammond. The event will take place on January 29 at Orange Street, Down Town.

JaRIA's signature event will be "Reggae Nights" WHICH WILL OPEN February 1st at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. This will be a celebration of musical heritage through classical, jazz, mento and ska. Reggae Month was officially declared by Sir Kenneth Hall, then Governor General of Jamaica, on January 24, 2008. The full calendar for Reggae Month will be revealed at a press launch today at the Bob Marley Museum.




Irie FM celebrates Peter Tosh

Webmin
No Comments

Peter Tosh

In celebration of Reggae month IRIE FM will hit the road again to pay homage to the legendary Peter Tosh

On Feb 27 IRIE FM will have a special outside broadcast at the Peter Tosh Museum in Bluefield, Westmorland

The media house will celebrate Peter Tosh life, work and legacy from 6 AM to 2 PM with the Running African show with Andrea Williams and Sunday Sunshine with Big A.

The IRE FM's broadcast will feature nyabinghi drummers, live performances and much more.

Enhanced by Zemanta







Another year, another Black History Month. There are currently lectures, readings, and performances taking place throughout the country.

Quanae Palmer-Chambliss, 41, is a single Black mother and education paraprofessional. She is raising four boys on her own. Quanae says that she recently moved to a beautiful townhouse complex in Edison, New Jersey.

“Management is very strict about the people they rent apartments to,” she explains to me; but, something else is on her mind even though it is Black History Month.

Quanae is concerned about certain Black folks who destroy apartment buildings and neighborhoods, she says, with Promethean speed and demolition-like efficiency.

“I wonder if some of their bad habits are attributable to a lack of Black leadership?,” she asked me.

“Black folks have had more great Black leaders than you can count. What more can Black leaders say to certain Black folks who simply just don’t get it?“ I responded.

Within the Black community, there are Black folks who simply have not absorbed the message of self-love, civility, and decency that is inherent in Black leadership narratives. Do Black folks bear any inverse responsibility to Black leaders who have emphasized social uplift and progress?

Even if Moses showed up in the ‘hood at midnight carrying a modified version of the Ten Commandments—these are tough times!—it is likely that young Black folks would refer to him on a first name basis as “Dog” or “Pop.”

About a few blocks into his mission—if the Black teenagers who have been killed and robbed by other Blacks for their Air Jordan sneakers, gold chains, and I-Pods are any indication—Black thugs might tell Moses to give up his Egyptian cotton robe, Barenia leather sandals, and 18-caret gold staff. And it is a strong possibility that he would be left butt naked standing on the sidewalk. Or Moses could be shot—possibly dead—and robbed.

Extreme?

Despite the gains some Blacks have made since the 1960s, there are also many other Blacks who are far from The Promised Land envisioned by many Black leaders.

Eugene Robinson, The Washington Post columnist, recently published a book called Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America. He argues that there are four distinct classes of Black-Americans: Mainstream, Abandoned, Transcendent, and Emergent.

I guess Quanae is alluding to Abandoned-class Blacks. Robinson defines this class as, “A large Abandoned minority with less hope of escaping poverty and dysfunction than at any time since Reconstruction’s crushing end.”

Quanae is fortunate. She could be living further south in Camden, New Jersey. It is one of the poorest cities in the nation.

While President Obama’s recent State of the Union Address highlighted American exceptionalism, he certainly did not address budget cuts well underway in many cities and states.

Camden recently laid-off 168 police officers, or 45 percent of its force, to close a budget gap. According to FBI crime data, Camden ranked second, only to St. Louis, as the most dangerous city in America in 2009.

As cities and states are compelled to close budget deficits, how are the abandoned, not to mention Black middle-class workers employed by the government, supposed to survive as cuts to government services and job layoffs continue unabated?

The U.S. government is staring in the face of potentially unimaginable social unrest. The turmoil we witness today in Cairo, Egypt could arrive on our doorsteps tomorrow, courtesy of the continued economic dislocation of millions of Americans.

Meanwhile, Black single working mothers like Quanae are forced to ask difficult questions about the vagaries of Black life at Ground Zero.

I told Quanae that to righteously respond to her question requires an understanding of what sociologists call “structural forces.” It also requires an inevitable “internal discussion” that Blacks must engage.

Meanwhile, Black intellectuals, scholars, and mental health professionals should consider establishing a national dialogue on Black civility.

This dialogue must address the violence, psychic alienation, distrust, and the disregard for Black life that plagues the Black
community.

Article written by Hakim Hasan






Black people you should know

Webmin
No Comments



AT A GLANCE:
The American Red Cross blood program of today is a direct result of the work of medical pioneer Dr. Charles Drew, beginning in 1940 and throughout World War II. Dr. Drew was instrumental in developing blood plasma processing, storage and transfusion therapy. His groundbreaking work in the large-scale production of human plasma was eventually used by the U.S. Army and the American Red Cross as the basis for blood banks.. THE STORY
RELATED INFO

Milestones:
1904 Charles Drew born on June 3, in Washington D.C.
1939 Drew married Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children
1940 Completes his doctoral thesis, titled "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".
1940 Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project.
1941 Drew was named director of the newly formed Red Cross Blood Bank .
1950 Drew died on April 1, in an auto accident while traveling to a medical convention
CAPS: Drew, Charles Drew, Charles Richard Drew, Dr. John Scudder, American Red Cross, ARY, blood bank, blood plasma, dried blood, blood transfusion, SIP, history, biography, inventor, invention, story, facts.
The Story:
Dr. Charles Richard Drew was the first person to develop the blood bank. His introduction of a system for the storing of blood plasma revolutionized the medical profession. Drew first utilized his system on the battlefields of Europe and the Pacific during World War II. He organized the world's first blood bank project in 1940 - Blood for Britain. He also established the American Red Cross Blood Bank, of which he was the first director.

Drew was born in Washington, D.C. June 3, 1904 to Richard and Nora Drew, and was the oldest of five children. In his youth he seemed headed for a career in athletics and the coaching field rather than for medicine, starring as a four letter man in Dunbar High School, Washington. He went on to study at Amherst College, where he was a star athlete, all-American half-back and captain of his Amherst College football team.

After graduation, Charles Drew was a coach and a biology and chemistry instructor at Morgan State College, Baltimore, Maryland. But a turning point in his life was at hand. It had become his ambition to enter the field of medicine. He resigned his job at Morgan State and went to Montreal, Canada, where he enrolled in McGill University's Medical School. There he was granted two fellowships and was awarded his doctorate of medicine and master of surgery degrees.

For two years following graduation, Dr. Drew was an intern and resident in Montreal hospitals. In 1935, he returned to the United States to accept an appointment as instructor in pathology at the College of Medicine of Howard University in Washington, D.C. During the next two years, he advanced to become assistant professor of surgery.

Dr. Drew showed such promise in his work at Howard University that in 1938, at a time when war clouds were gathering over Europe, he was recommended for one of the Rockefeller fellowships at Columbia aimed at promoting advanced training in all fields of medicine. It was through this fellow ship that he met Dr. John Scudder and began study under him.

Dr. Drew was married in 1939 to Minnie Lenore Robbins, and they had four children, Bebe Roberta, Charlene Rosella, Rhea Sylvia, and Charles Richard, Jr. Shortly after, Dr. Drew earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from Columbia University in 1940, with a 200 page doctoral thesis under the title "Banked Blood: A Study in Blood Preservation".

Drew received an urgent cablegram from a former teacher, who had returned to England. The cable requested 5,000 glass containers of dried plasma for transfusions, plus the same amount three weeks later. A large project was started in August 1940 to collect blood in New York City hospitals for the export of plasma to Britain. Dr. Drew was appointed medical supervisor of the "Plasma for Britain" project. His notable contribution at this time was to transform the test tube methods of many blood researchers, including himself, into the first successful mass production techniques.

By this time it had become apparent that America probably would be drawn into the war. Military authorities in the United States were concerned with the need for a stockpile of blood reserves if hostilities should begin. Dr. Drew had emerged as a leading authority on mass transfusion and processing methods.

After discussions with medical leaders and the American Red Cross, the government asked the Red Cross to establish a pilot program similar to the Plasma for Britain Project but on a smaller scale. Charles Drew was named director of the Red Cross Blood Bank and assistant director of the National Research Council, in charge of blood collection for the United States Army and Navy. The pilot center was set up through the Red Cross chapter in New York City and began operation in February 1941.

In 1941, Dr. Drew returned to Howard University, where he gained new distinction, particularly in the training of young surgeons. He had spent a total of seven months in the two blood projects, yet in this very brief but productive period of his professional life, he made an outstanding contribution to what was to become a highly successful World War II blood procurement effort.

After Dr. Drew's return to Howard, he was appointed to several scientific committees and received honorary degrees from Virginia State and Amherst Colleges in 1945 and 1947. He was one of the first of his race to be selected for membership on the American Board of Surgery. He also received the Spingarn Medal of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1944 for his outstanding contribution to human welfare.

The experience gained through Dr. Drew's efforts at the Red Cross New York center proved invaluable, and during World War II, 35 blood bank centers were in operation. By war's end, millions of donations had been received by the Red Cross, donations that made possible the saving of thousands of lives of wounded U.S. servicemen lives that would have been lost in earlier wars when blood therapy was unknown.

Mankind suffered a great loss in 1950 when, at the age of 45, Dr. Drew was killed in an automobile accident while driving to a scientific conference. His pioneering medical work has endured. How many lives have been saved because of his genius at turning basic biological research into practical production methods is impossible to determine. But it is a certainty that mankind owes a debt of gratitude to Charles Richard Drew.

BOOKS

WEB SITES

WHERE TO FIND

QUOTATIONS

HOW IT WORKS

DID YOU KNOW?

Inventor: Charles Richard Drew

Charles Drew photo courtesy Dr. Charles Drew, Medical Pioneer book cover

Criteria: First practical. Modern prototype.

Birth: June 3, 1904,in Washington, D.C.

Death: April 1, 1950 while traveling in rural North Carolina.

Nationality: American

Invention: Blood Bank

Blood drive photo courtesy American Red Cross

Function: noun / blood plasma

Definition: A place, usually a separate division of a hospital laboratory, in which blood is collected from donors, typed, and often separated into several components for future transfusion to recipients. The American Red Cross operates the largest blood bank in the U.S.





Let’s really celebrate Black History Month

Webmin
No Comments




By Rae ROQ

So February is Black History Month and we all know this, but how many of us take the time to think about it and actually celebrate in our own personal way?
Black History Month is more than a month created to remember great black people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Marcus Garvey, and Nelson Mandela. This is a month in which we can celebrate not only our freedom, but look towards a brighter future. African people have come from a lineage of bondage and progression. Our ancestors suffered more than we have, so it is only right to be grateful for everything that we have and are lucky to get.
From the Civil Rights movement, to black people breaking into the entertainment industry, dominating the sports scene, and America electing its first black president, we have shown that we are an evolving race capable of doing anything that we put our mind to. While chasing our own dreams it is only proper to pay homage to those who have paved the way.
There have been Jamaican artistes such as Grace Jones and Bob Marley who have created their own legacy. Many artistic concepts, such as photo shoot concepts used by present day super models like Amber Rose, have been revived from the portfolio book of Grace Jones. Bob Marley is still, and always will be, an international household name and icon. He will always be remembered for creating great music and trying to bring knowledge and positive vibes to the people.
Oprah Winfrey has made the Forbe's list year after year, but she is also well known for her generosity. She recently created her OWN network and has built a school for girls in Africa. Maya Angelou is one of the most inspirational writers to keep in mind when you want to put a pen to a pad and paint a picture with words.
Celebrate Black History Month this year by reading a great black book or watching a movie. Try researching a black person who has made great accomplishments online. You may be shocked to recognize that you may have something in common with them. Don’t let it pass you by this year.
Black is beautiful.





Top 9 Black Television Talk Show Hosts

Webmin
No Comments




You got questions? These nine television hosts probably had them too, for a wide array of celebrities, politicians, athletes, and everyday people with amazing stories. Check out our list of the nine best black television talk show hosts. 1. Oprah Winfrey Initially The Oprah Winfrey Show was just another talk show when it debuted in 1986. But what made it stand out and rise above the rest was the show’s host. Now The Oprah Winfrey Show is only a small part of Oprah’s empire, and in 2011, will cease to exist in its current format. But not because the show is cancelled, Oprah is moving onto something bigger than her own show. She’s starting her own network, appropriately called OWN.

2. Arsenio Hall The Arsenio Hall Show revolutionized late night television. Just ask Bill Clinton who many say would have never won the 1992 presidential election had it not been for his surprise appearance on that show.

3. Mo’Nique Unlike Arsenio, The Mo’Nique Show has a lot more competition in that late night slot. But the Oscar-winning comedienne has been able to hold her own against, pulling in her own unique audience on BET. While the rest of America was tuning into the drama of the late night talk show wars between Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno, plenty others tuned them out and tuned into Mo’Nique.

4. Tyra Banks A show about service as much as it was celebrity, through The Tyra Show, Tyra used her beauty and brains for good. What Oprah is to the stay-at-home moms of America, Tyra was to the teenagers of America who came home after school and needed a big sister to understand them.

5. Wendy Williams The popular radio DJ has successfully taken her format and gift of gossip to the small screen. Though Vh1 would air her radio show, The Wendy Williams Show has shown the queen of talk radio can also sit down on a couple of comfortable couch chairs and ask questions with the best of them.

6. Whoopi Goldberg The moderator of The View is fearless and isn’t afraid to call it like she sees it. And if someone else is calling it like she sees it on the show, she’s not afraid to retort or even walk away.

7. Montell Williams As a former Marine, and a victim to multiple scoliosis, Williams — an Emmy Award winning talk show host — used his show as a platform to bring awareness to various social issues in an aggressive style.

8. Star Jones The controversial panel member on The View during it’s early years was one of the sharpest and most entertaining women on the panel.

9. Tavis Smiley Many people were shocked when BET let Tavis Smiley’s contract as host of BET Tonight expire, but the charming media personality has landed on his feet. Now the host of his very own PBS show, Tavis Smiley, Smiley is doing what he does best, interviewing the people we’ve always wanted to talk to ourselves, asking them the questions we’ve always wanted to ask.








The Bob Marley Museum will on Friday, November 5 observe the 80th anniversary of the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I (The First) with a charity concert.

Fund raised will go towards the refurbishing of the Haile Selassie High.

"The school is in dire need of funds to assist with further development of the school, and it is with this in mind that the Friends of The Haile Selassie High School are doing their part in assisting in this project," said promoter Dr. Michael Barnett.

The concert line-up includes several well-known cultural reggae artistes such as Junior Reid with Andrew and Wada Blood, Determine, Warrior King, Andrew Tosh, Mikey General, Fred Locks, The Artist M, Herzon, The Uprising Roots Band, The Twelve Tribes of Israel and many more.

The show will also unveil a surprise vintage guest artiste.

The actual date of Haile Selassie’s coronation was November 2, 1930, but Dr. Barnett said the celebration was pushed back because of other events taking place on that day.





Jamaica a big winner at World Travel Awards

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica came out a big winner in the 2010 World Travel Awards, copping some 18 major awards in the travel and tourism categories.

At the gala ceremony held at the swanky Sandals Whitehouse European Village and Spa in Westmoreland on Friday (October 22), Jamaica took home honours for being Caribbean Leading Destination; Caribbean Leading Cruise Destination Excursion; Caribbean Leading Airport (Sangster International); Caribbean Leading Meeting and Conference Centre (Jamaica Conference Centre); Leading Hotel (Sandals Negril Beach Resort); Leading Resort (Sandals Whitehouse) and Leading Spa Resort (Half Moon, Montego Bay), among others.

Hundreds of representatives of the travel and tourism industry from the Caribbean, North, Central and South America attended the event, which is known as the Oscars of tourism.

Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, who addressed the gathering, said that Jamaica was proud to be hosting the prestigious awards ceremony for the 17th year, which was testimony to the world class destination that the country had become.

He said that the accolades and recognition from the World Travel Awards, "speak to the excellence and service quality assurance that an international visitor can expect when selecting a destination or travel brand".

"It is well known that once a traveller sees the World Travel Awards symbol, they can be assured of the quality and they will know that they are getting the absolute best. It is a renowned badge of service excellence," he stated.

The Minister credited the achievement to the various stakeholders in the sector, noting that "it is the service quality and a visitor experience that epitomises excellence, which depicts a world class destination and resort. While Jamaica boasts the most diverse and largest number of attractions in the Caribbean, it is the warmth and tenacity of our people that create the winning experience."





Gregory Isaacs' body to be flown home November 11

Webmin
No Comments



The body of international reggae singer Gregory Isaacs will be flown to Jamaica on November 11.

The body will be escorted by his children and grand-children who reside in Britain.

His wife, Linda, who resides in the United Kingdom, says a memorial service will be held in London before the body is returned home.

The UK service is scheduled to held at 2pm on November 10 at the 'All Saints' Church in Harrow Weald, Isaac's London hometown.

Mrs. Isaacs reportedly told RJR News that Culture Minister, Olivia 'Babsy' Grange, has organised an official funeral to be held at the National Arena.

Gregory Isaacs died in London on Monday, October 25, after being diagnosed with lung cancer.





REGGAE MOURNS THE LOSS OF A LEGEND - GREGORY ISAACS

Webmin
5 Comments





Reggae Singer Passes Away in London from Lung Cancer
Gregory Isaacs
[July 15, 1951 - October 25, 2010]


October 25, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(VP RECORDS, NEW YORK) - The reggae community mourns the loss of one of its legends, Gregory Isaacs. Best known for his lovers' rock anthems, the versatile and velvet-voiced crooner was recognized by the international masses for his talent and contribution to music for decades, and remains an icon for the genre.

Isaacs was born on July 15, 1951 in Kingston, Jamaica andgained appeal and acclaim in the 1970s and 1980s for hits such as "Night Nurse" and "Rumors." Nicknamed the 'Cool Ruler' by his fans, Isaacs pioneered his own sound by fusing traditional reggae with dancehall, thereby reinventing the genre and expanding its global fan base into what it is today.

"Gregory Isaacs leaves behind an iconic history and catalog that is unparalleled," reveals VP Records CEO, Christopher Chin. "He devoted his entire life to music and his memory will forever live on with us - through his music and the legacy he leaves behind."

Isaacs fought a year-long battle with lung cancer before passing away on October 25, 2010 at his home in London, at the age of 59. Condolences and prayers go out to his family and loved ones during this trying time.

______________







Dancehall artistes Baby Cham and Bounty Killer who have not recorded together in almost a decade have reunited on a new single from producer Dave Kelly.


The new song is titled Stronger and also features Mykal Rose.
Stronger was released locally this week and is already spreading its wings on mainstream radio stations around the world.


Baby Cham, whose given name is Damian Beckett and Bounty Killer, whose real name is Rodney Price, were close friends in the 1990s but parted ways over unknown disagreements.


The two have reportedly worked out their differences and will also be working together to produce another mega hits like Another Level.
According to reports, Baby Cham is also an official member of the Bounty Killer-led Alliance.








Information released by the police show that the crime rate is trending down.

Between January 1 and September 30 this year, 1,065 murders were recorded, 135 fewer than to the same period last year. In 2008, the total recorded over the same period was 1,241.


The statistics show a 42 per cent dip in murders for the month of September, which saw 77 murders — including that of four children, two women and two cops — being committed in comparison to 132 in September 2009. This is the first time since July 2002 that the monthly tally has dipped below 80.


The gun was the most-used weapon. Fifty-seven persons were shot to death, 12 were killed by knives and three were chopped to death; while five murders were committed with implements listed as 'other'. There were also two drive-by shootings and four double murders last month.


Fatal shootings by the police also declined from 21 in September last year to 12 last month.


Police statistics indicate that 81 persons were shot and injured last month, a 39 per cent drop from the 132 shootings documented in September 2009.


Twelve revolvers, 15 pistols, a submachine gun, one homemade gun and a rifle, a total of 30 guns, were seized last month, 13 less than in September last year. A total of 175 rounds of assorted ammunition were also seized last month.






Allan ‘Skill’ Cole among 10 honoured by JFF

Webmin
No Comments



Former footballer Allan ‘Skill’ Cole were among ten people who were honoured by the JFF for their significant contribution to the development of football in Jamaica. They were honoured at a reception held on the occasion of the visit of the president of the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA), Joseph Sepp Blatter, at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel September 26.

"It is great, great pleasure for me to be with you," said Blatter. "I am grateful now to be with you when awards are being presented to those who have served over the years and all volunteers in this sport."

The awardees were former prime minister and current chairman of the Premier League Clubs' Association, Edward Seaga; former prime minister P.J. Patterson; former St Catherine FA president for 42 years, Lincoln 'Happy' Sutherland; former national footballer and coach, Allan 'Skill' Cole; coach of Seba United, Weston King; football administrator and coach, John Green; former president of Kingston and St Andrew Footbal Association (KSAFA) and former vice-president of the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF), David 'Billy' Marston; former general secretary of KSAFA and the JFF, Russell Bell; former Trelawny FC president, Neville Glanville; and JFF administrator and Santos coach, Carlton Dennis.

JFF President Captain Horace Burrell pointed out that there are other persons deserving of awards who will be acknowledged in the future.

"There are many others who are quite deserving of awards ... your time will come, don't worry about it," he affirmed. "We are only awarding 10 persons tonight; in the future we will be awarding more."

Cole, who is the youngest player to represent Jamaica at the national level - age 16 - was very pleased to finally be honoured in his own country.

"I lived in Ethiopia for three years and in one season I got a lot of accolades in the country," said Cole. "I have played for Jamaica from I was 16 and just getting an award, so I must cherish and honour it.

"I feel very honoured and it is good to know people recognise what you are doing and you are honoured before you pass away," said Dennis in response to being recognised.





Happy Birthday Daddy Marcus

Webmin
1 Comment




Jamaica's first National Hero was born in St. Ann's Bay, St. Ann, on August 17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston, where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".


During his career Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries, observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.
In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self-government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects and protest against racial discrimination.
In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.
However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.
Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity, forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections but won a seat on the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC).


But the world of the 1930s was not ready for Garvey's progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.


Garvey's legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught - race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for rulers to govern on behalf of the working classes.







The Cabinet has approved the establishment of a Committee and Secretariat to lead the celebration of Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence in 2012.


The Planning Committee will be drawn from representatives of the private cultural sector; tourism, education, youth, financial, agriculture and mining sectors; as well as the religious community, among other sectors.


The Planning Committee along with the Secretariat which will be housed at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, will be responsible for the planning and implementation of activities toward the Jamaica 50 celebrations including the staging of CARIFESTA as part of Jamaica 50 celebrations.


Minister Grange said:“We want to our jubilee celebrations in 2012 to be the best yet. Jamaica 50 will be memorable. We will celebrate our strengths as a nation as we plan for the future with purpose, faith and confidence.”<


The Secretariat will be supported by the agencies of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, in particular the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission.


Jamaica will celebrate 50 years as an independent nation on August 6, 2012.





BDA1.jpg





Michael Jackson Humanitarian Deeds

Webmin
2 Comments

0023ae606f170b29c7d05d.jpg
April 14, 1984: Michael equips a 19-bed-unit at Mount Senai New York Medical Center. This center is part of the T.J. Martell-Foundation for leukemia and cancer research.



July 5, 1984: During the Jackson's press conference at Tavern On The Green, Michael announces that his part of the earnings from the Victory Tour will be donated to three charitable organizations: The United Negro College Fund, Camp Good Times, and the T.J. Martell-Foundation.



July 14, 1984: After the first concert of the Victory Tour, Michael meets 8 terminally ill children backstage.





Happy Mother’s Day

Webmin
3 Comments

Happy_Mothers_Day.jpg
This Sunday the world over will be celebrating Mother’s Day…but how did it all come about? How come we are now recognizing the significant contribution that mothers have made from creation?



The history of Mother's Day is centuries old and the earliest Mother's Day celebrations can be traced back to the spring celebrations of ancient Greece in honor of Rhea, the Mother of the Gods. During the 1600's, the early Christians in England celebrated a day to honor Mary, the mother of Christ. By a religious order the holiday was later expanded in its scope to include all mothers, and named as the Mothering Sunday. Celebrated on the 4th Sunday of Lent (the 40 day period leading up to Easter), "Mothering Sunday" honored the mothers of England.



In the United States, Mother's Day was loosely inspired by the British day and was first suggested after the American Civil War by social activist Julia Ward Howe. During the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870s, Julia began a one-woman peace crusade and made an impassioned "appeal to womanhood" to rise against war. In 1872, she went to London to promote an international Woman's Peace Congress. She began promoting the idea of a "Mother's Day for Peace" to be celebrated on June 2, honoring peace, motherhood and womanhood. In the Boston Mass, she initiated a Mothers' Peace Day observance on the second Sunday in June, a practice that was to be established as an annual event and practiced for at least 10 years. The day was, however, mainly intended as a call to unite women against war. The celebrations died out when she turned her efforts to working for peace and women's rights in other ways. Howe failed in her attempt to get the formal recognition of a Mother's Day for Peace.





Michael Lee-Chin

Webmin
2 Comments

MichaelLeeChin_188.jpgMichael Lee-Chin was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica to black and Chinese Jamaicans. When Lee-Chin was 7 his mother married Vincent Chen. He attended Titchfield High School between 1962 and 69.

In 1970 he earned a scholarship to study Civil Engineering at McMaster University in Canada. He worked briefly as a road engineer for the Jamaican Government but unable to find a job in his qualified field he returned to Canada.

He had various jobs until he secured a loan in 1983 for C$500,000 from the Continental Bank of Canada and purchased a stake in Mackenzie Financial Group and formed Kicks Athletics with Andrew Gayle which was worth C$3.5 million by 1987.

With these proceeds he bought a Kitchener based company called the Advantage Investment Council for C$200,000. He renamed the company AIC and developed it into a fund that today controls C$6 billion, with hundreds of investors.

He continued to form and acquire companies that deals in investments, securities and insurance through the Berkshire Group of Companies which by 2007 amassed C$12 billion in assets. On October 5, 2006, Lee-Chin announced his resignation fron AIC and was replaced by Johnathan Wellum, AIC's Chief Investment Officer. He remains as AIC's Executive Chairman.





Robert L. Johnson

Webmin
No Comments

robert_johnson.jpgRobert L. Johnson was born in Hickory, Mississippi on April 8, 1946. He was the ninth of ten children born to Edna and Archie Johnson. He studied history at the University of Illinois, where he graduated with a bachelor's degree. He also earned a master's degree in International Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

In 1979 he founded Black Entertainment Television (BET), which was the first cable television aimed at African Americans. It was launched in January 1980, broadcasting for two hours per week.
Presently, BET reaches more than 65 million US homes. It has become the first black-controlled company listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

BET has expanded into other BET -related television channels that encompasses the BET Networks: BETJ, BET Hip Hop and BET Gospel.
In 1998 Johnson made the company private by buying back all of its publicly traded stock. In 1999 Viacom bought BET for $3 billion. Johnson's 63 percent share made him the richest black person (before being usurped by Oprah Winfrey) with assets of a billion dollars after taxes. He continued to be the company's chairman and CEO for six years before turning over the titles of President and Chief Operating Officer of BET to Debra L. Lee a former BET vice president.

Johnson started the RLJ Companies whose goal was to create a holding company and asset management firm run by a minority business person. The RLJ Companies has a diverse portfolio of companies touching on all area of their business industry, ie. real estate, financial service, hospitality, sports, film, automotive and gaming. RLJ has headquarters all across the USA.





Black Uhuru

Webmin
1 Comment

black_uhuru.jpgThe reggae band Black Uhuru was formed by Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson in the 1970's. The band whose name Uhuru is Swahili for freedom was the first group to win a Grammy when the reggae category was introduced in 1985 for the single "What is Life' on the "Anthem'" album.

Over the years the group went through many changes; the first group members were Garth Dennis, Don Carlos and Derrick 'Duckie' Simpson. Then Carlos left and was replaced by Michael Rose, then Dennis left and was replaced by Errol Nelson. During this period the band released its most famous album "Love Crisis" later re-released as "Black Sounds of Freedom". Sandra 'Puma' Jones joined the group in 1979 and with this new line-up; Rose, Simpson and Jones, along with Sly & Robbie as producers and drum and bass players, they release "Sinsemilla", "Red", "Chill Out" and the Grammy winning "Anthem", which were there most popular album.

Black Uhuru became one of the most popular reggae groups in the world touring with super stars such as the Police, the Rolling Stones and the Clash.





Portia Simpson-Miller

Webmin
No Comments

Portia Simpson-Miller.jpgPortia Lucretia Simpson-Miller ON, MP was born on December 12, 1945 in Wood Hall, St. Catherine. She has the distinction of being Jamaica's first female Prime Minister from March 30, 2006 - September 11, 2007. She is presently the President and Leader of the Opposition. She is also a member of the 'Council of Women World Leaders' which is an International network of former and current women presidents and prime ministers whose mission is to mobilize women leaders in a collective effort to take action on issues critical to women and equitable development.
Mrs Simpson-Miller became the third woman to become Prime Minister in the English speaking Caribbean, when she succeeded ongoing Prime Minister P.J. Patterson. She now holds the position as President of the opposition People's National Party.
Prior to being Prime Minister she was the Minister of local Government and Sport since 2002. She has also served as Minister of Labour, Welfare and Sports; Minister of Labour, Social Security and Sports; Minister of Tourism and Sports and Defence Minister.
On September 2007 her party narrowly lost the 2007 general election to the rival Jamaica Labour Party 32 to 28 seats (after recounts). Simpson-Miller initially refused to concede defeat citing unfair voting regulations, but finally conceded when the Organization of American States issued a statement declaring the election free and fair. She was succeeded as Prime Minister by JLP leader Bruce Golding.
In July 2008 she was challenged for the Presidency of the PNP by her rival Dr. Peter Phillips. The election was held among the party's delegates on September 20, 2008. She defeated Phillips by an even wider margin than that of the previous election.
Simpson-Miller holds a Bachelor of Arts in public administration from the Union Institute, who also gave her an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters.
She is married to the Most Honorable Errald Miller, former CEO of Cable & Wireless Jamaica Limited.
She was invested with the Jamaican O





Merlene Joyce Ottey

Webmin
3 Comments

Merlene Joyce Ottey.jpgMerlene Joyce Ottey was born on May 10, 1960 in Cold Spring, Hanover, Jamaica to Hubert and Joan Ottey. She was introduced to track & field by her mother.
Ottey attended Gurnrys Mount and Pondside Schools, Ruseas and Vere Technical high schools, where she competed in barefooted races.
Ottey was inspired by listening to track & field broadcasts of the 1976 Summer Olympics. Her athletic career took off while attending University of Nebraska in the USA in 1979.
Over time Ottey won many awards: In 1982 she won the gold medal in the 200m and silver in the 100m at the 1982 Commonwealth Games.
In the 1990 Commonwealth Games she won gold in both events. She was named Ambassador of Jamaica for the Year 15 times between 1979 - 1997.
In total, Ottey has won right Olympic medals, but never an Olympic gold. She has to her credit three silver and five bronze medals which earned her the nickname "The Bronze Queen". She also has won 14 World Championship medals between 1983 - 1997- more than any other althete, male or female.
On 1999 a banned substance was descovered in her urine and she was banned from competing in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia. She also pulled out of the World Championships as she strove to clear her name, which she eventually did by the summer of that year in time to be selected to compete in the Olympic games.
She ran fourth in the controversial race and vowed that even though she could still run at 40 she would not run for Jamaica anymore as she felt as they were trying to push her out of the sport.





Arthur Wint - Jamaica's first Olympic gold medalist

Webmin
No Comments

arthur_wint.jpgArthur Wint was born in Plowden, Manchester, Jamaica on May 3, 1920. He was the Jamaican Boy Athlete of the Year in 1937, he won a gold medal in the 800m at the Central American Games in Panama.

He joined the Royal Air Force and while undergoing training in Canada he set the 400m record. After taking part in active duty as a pilot in WWii he left the Air Force in 1947 to attend medical school at St. Bartholomews Hospital.

In 1948 he won Jamaica's fist gold medal for the 400m (46.2) in London beating team mate Herb McKenley. He also won the silver medal in the 800m.

Wint was also part of the historic relay team, in Helsinki's 1952 games, where they set the world record and captured the gold medal in the 4 X 400m relay. He also once again won siver in the 800m.

Arthur Wint ran his final race in 1953 at Wembley Stadium, completed his internship, graduated as a doctor and was made a Member of the British Empire (MBE) by Queen Elizabeth the following year.





Oprah Winfrey

Webmin
4 Comments

oprah_winfrey.jpgOprah Gail Winfrey was born January 29, 1954 in Kosciusko, Mississippi. She escaped a troubled childhood living with her mother where she was repeatedly sexually abused by male family members and friends, to live with her father in Nashville.
She attended Tennessee State University in 1971 and began working in radio and television.
In 1976 Oprah moved to Baltimore where she hosted the TV talk show, "People are Talking", the show was a hit and Oprah stayed with it for eight years. Her success led her to Stephen Speilberg's 1985 film "The Color Purple" for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.
She launched the Oprah Winfrey Show in 1986. The show was such a success that she gained ownership of it from ABC and placed it under the control of her production company Harpo Productions and made more money from syndications. Her show free of tabloid topics earned her the respect and popularity of her viewers.
Harpo has undertaken many projects, one being the production of the 1989 miniseries "The Women of Brewsters Palce" which Oprah also starred in.
Oprah well known for her constant struggle with her weight is also known for the launching of "Oprah's Book Club" as part of her talk show. This is where novels are introduced, read and discussed on air.
Oprah has the distinction of being one of the most powerful and wealthy people in show business. According to Forbes Magazine, Oprah is the richest African American of the 20th century and the world's only black billionaire 3 years running.





Malcom X

Webmin
1 Comment

malcom x.jpgMalcolm Little (Malcolm X) was born in Omaha, nebraska, USA on May 19, 1925.
As a teenager he was involved in pimping and drugs. In 1946 he was arrested, charged and sentenced to ten years in prison for burglary. While in prison he discovered the anti-white Black Muslims.
In 1952 Malcolm joined the Muslims and became a recruiter, changed his name and began writing. He became well known for his 1959 television documentary. Both his writings and his documentary portrayed him as a threat to white people.
After breaking from the Muslims in 1964 he founded the Muslim Mosque in an effort to internationalize the Afro-American struggle. He travelled to Muslim lands and was impressed with their lack of racial bias. He became convinced that whites were not all born inherently racist. He once again re-invented himself and called himself El-Haff Malik El Shabazz and formed the Organisation of African American Unity in hopes of co-operating with progressive white groups.
Malcolm influenced the movements of black power and neo-colonialism by transforming the consciousness of generations of African-Americans.
He was assassinated in New York City in 1965, and it was believed that members of the Nation of Islam were involved.





Louis Armstrong

Webmin
No Comments

lois-armstrong.jpgLouis Armstrong born on August 4, 1901 in New Orleans, Louisiana USA was one of the leading trumpeters and most influential jazz artistes of his time.
Armstrong grew up poor and did odd jobs while listening to jazz music and singing in a boys' quartet. While spending time in Waifs Home for coloured juvenile delinquents (1913) he learned to play cornet in the home's band. Music quickly became his passion and in his teens he quickly learned more about music by listening to jazz musicians such as King Oliver. He became skilled and was soon playing in jazz bands and even replaced Oliver in the Kid Ory Band (1918), and played in Mississippi riverboat dance bands during the early 20's.
Oliver invited Armstrong to play second cornet in his Creole Jazz Band which included outstanding musicians such as Johnny and Baby Dodds and pianist Lil Hardin who he later married in 1924.
Armstrong recorded his first soloist pieces "Chimes Blues" and "Tears" which he produced with his wife.
Lil encouraged Armstrong to quit Oliver's band and he played in Fletcher Henderson's band in New York for a year before returning to Chicago to play in large orchestras. There he created his most important works - The Armstrong Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings of 1925 - 1928 which made him the first jazz soloist. He recorded solo pieces such as "Hotter than That", "Struttin' with some Barbecue" among others. By this time Armstrong was playing trumpet and his style was far superior to that of his competitors.





Maya Angelou

Webmin
9 Comments

maya_angelou.jpgMaya Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. Both she and her brother, Bailey, were sent to live with their grandmother in rural Stamps, Arkansas when their parents separated.
During a visit to her mother in St. Louis Maya Angelou was raped by her mother's boyfriend - she was eight. She later testified against the man, who was beaten to death by her uncles. Blaming herself for his death, Maya refused to speak for five years.
She attended high schools in both Arkansas and California and was the first African American female streetcar conductor in San Francisco, California.
She gave birth to a son at 16 and later married Tosh Angelos in 1950. They soon separated.
Maya Angelou studied drama and dance and went on to perform in theatre where she appeared in "Porgy and Bess" and "Cabaret for Freedom" which she co-wrote with Godfrey Cambridge.
During the 1960's she moved to Cairo, Egypt where she worked as the associate editor of the Arab Observer. She also contributed articles to The Ghanaian Times and was featured on the Ghanaian Broadcasting Corporation programming Accra, Ghana. During the 1960's she was also the Assistant administrator of the School of Music and Drama at the University of Ghana. She was also the feature editor of the African Review in Accra from 1964-1966. Upon her return to the USA civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requested that she serve as northern coordinator for Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
She wrote her first autobiographical novel " I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings" in 1970, which tells of her life up to the age of sixteen.





The "doctress" Mary Seacole

Webmin
1 Comment

487px-Mary_Seacole_Drawing.jpgMary Seacole, born in Kingston in 1805 to a Scottish army officer and a free black woman who not only nursed the sick, ran a boarding house but who also taught her daughter about the healing properties of herbal medicine.

Mary Seacole, using herbal medicine, played a pivotal role in not only the 1850 cholera epidemic but also the yellow fever outbreak in Jamaica. As her notoriety grew she was soon performing operations on persons suffering from gunshot and knife wounds.

From her travels across the Caribbean, Mary Seacole increased her knowledge of how people used local plants and herbs to treat the sick. She also treated persons afflicted with cholera in Panama. Mary learnt more about how the cholera disease attacked the body by performing an autopsy on one of its victims.

When soldiers of the Crimean War began to suffer from cholera and malaria, Mary went to London to offer her help and expertise but was rejected due to prejudice against women performing medicine. However, when the government was forced to change their minds they enlisted the less skilled Florence Nightingale along with a team of thirty-nine nurses. Mary's application to join Florence Nightingale's team was denied.

A successful business woman at the time, Mary travelled to Crimea at her own expense. She visited Florence Nightingale to offer her services but was once again turned down.





Independence Day of Jamaica

Webmin
6 Comments

The Spanish and the English rule

The Spanish settlers moved to Villa de la Vega, now known as Spanish Town, establishing it as the capital of Jamaica. The 1640s saw many people coming to Jamaica for its stunning beauty; especially the pirates who had a reputation of deserting their raiding parties and staying on in the island. The attacks by the pirates in Jamaican history can be traced back to nearly 100 years, between 1555 and 1655; the final attack leaving the island in the hands of the English.

The island of Jamaica was finally seized by the British forces in the form of a joint expedition by Admiral Sir William Penn and General Robert Venables in May 1655. The buccaneers were invited by the Governor to form their base at Port Royal to prevent Spanish aggression in 1657. The Spanish were defeated in the successive battles that followed, starting the extended reign of the British on Jamaican soil. Through the Treaty of Madrid in 1670, the British gained formal recognition of possession of Jamaica. Still part of the Island remained in the hands of some of the escaped slaves called the 'Maroons', with whom they signed a treaty on March 1, 1738. Even though much of the Spanish capital, Villa de la Vega, was burned during the English conquest, they renamed it Spanish Town and kept it as the island's capital.





Information on Emancipation Day

Webmin
2 Comments

The Road to Freedom

The day was August 1, the year 1838 and the event, Emancipation from Slavery. Tears of joy flowed incessantly, while shouts of freedom rang from the mountain tops and the plains, from the men, women and children, who had learnt that they were finally free of the oppressive social and economic system in which they were treated as less than human.

From its introduction in the West Indies in 15th Century, slavery was regarded by many as immoral and brutish, characterized by the destruction of the "innate characteristics of humankind, which are necessary for progress." The slave-owning class, who dominated the legislative system, drew up the slave laws, which were rigid. Some of these laws and punishments included forbidding slaves to hold meetings without permission from or under the supervision of a white person. Slaves were banned from beating drums and blowing horns as it was thought to be a signal of rebellion and they were severely beaten for slowing down in the fields.

The Quakers, a religious group, were among the first critics of the system and campaigned for its abolition. The campaign was led by Granville Sharpe, an English man who was successful in securing the freedom of an abandoned slave, Joseph Strong, in England 1787. The Quakers formed the 'Society For Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade' and others such as Sharpe, Thomas Clarkson, James Ramsey and Edmond Burke then joined it.

They argued that not only was slavery against the will of God, but was also the denial of civilization. They said that freedom was the true, natural state of man. However, their arguments proved futile as the sugar industry was booming.

Persons in favour of the system expressed the view that blacks were unprepared for freedom and would be harmed by it, and that not all men were born free and equal. They also held the view that Africans were different from whites and thus should be treated as animals.

It was not until the eighteenth century when the sugar industry began to decline that the anti-slavery movement received encouragement. The first victory for the abolitionist came in March of 1807, with the passage of the Bill for 'The Total and Immediate Abolition of the Slave Trade' in the British Parliament.

But, to a large extent, it was the slaves themselves who charted the course to their own freedom, by the many brutal revolts staged across the island. They had the help of the Maroons, those slaves who had escaped into the island's mountains. The most famous revolt was the 1831 "Christmas" or "Baptist War".

These rebellions, coupled with the decline in the sugar, caused a drain on the planters' coffers. With the possibility of a general uprising constantly threatening, the law to abolish slavery was once again proposed in the British Parliament in 1833 and this time was passed with little resistance.





edit-mikey-dread_dead.jpgA memorial service will be held this Saturday in Portland, Jamaica for the late television presenter, top radio personality, record producer and artist.


1976-1979

Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation in Kingston, Jamaica - Presenter: "Dread at the Controls Show" Technical Operator: Audio programs both live and recorded.

Awarded: Top Radio Personality in Jamaican Radio based on the unusual impact made on radio listeners and the popularity of recordings made.

Recorded/produced single: "Barber Saloon." Charted at number one on the local radio charts recorded several Top 10-reggae singles.

Performed live at Reggae Sunsplash in Jamaica along with other featured artists including Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Inner Circle, and Third World.

Produced first album "Dread at the Controls" (Trojan Records-London) and "African Anthem" (A Special Edition from Jamaica's radio program for Cruise Records-UK).

Worked at Treasure Isle Recording Studio-Jamaica as Audio Engineer.

Traveled to London on a promotional trip.





G.Stiebelpict2.jpgThere was every indication at a very early stage that George Stiebel was destined to lead an intriguing life. Born to a Jamaican housekeeper, and a German Jew in the 1820s, George was subject to a range of criticisms and harsh treatment from his peers as a result of his mixed parentage. School was therefore not as fulfilling an experience as it should have been, and he quit the classroom at age fourteen to become a carpenter’s apprentice. George quickly developed a flair for carpentry, and by age 19 he played an integral role in the reconstruction of the famous Ferry Inn, between Kingston and Spanish Town.

In the 1840's, George's father gave him start up capital to purchase a ship, which he began using to transport cargo between North and South America. Shortly after he purchased two additional ships to develop his new business venture in the Caribbean, including Cuba where a revolution was in high gear. He realized that the island would be ideal to undertake a lucrative gun-trading ring. While he did manage to make respectable profits from trading guns, he also fell in trouble with the law for his activities.

In 1851, George's life took a turn for the better when he married long time sweetheart Magdalene Baker, daughter of a Moravian Missionary. Soon after their son, Sigismund, named after George's father, was born. Two years later a girl, Theresa, joined the Stiebel family. Five years after their marriage, his ships were caught in a terrible storm, which destroyed the vessels. Unfortunately Stiebel was aboard one of the ships which sank off the coast of Venezuela. He managed to survive the wreckage and luckily he had the foresight to secure all his money which was stored in a leather belt. Stiebel's tenacity soon began to show results, because shortly after arriving in Venezuela he became a peddler, and with his savings he purchased a mule to assist in transporting his goods. His misfortune at sea quickly dulled when he began trading gold in Venezuela. He invested in a gold mine with his friends, and fifteen years later in 1873 the business was showing huge profits. George Stiebel had undoubtedly made an impressive stake in the gold mining business and the accolade awarded to him as Jamaica's first millionaire of African descend seemed very deserving and appropriate. His achievements were shattered however with the death of his son, and he returned home to Jamaica.





Booker T Washington – a life worth emulating

Webmin
6 Comments

booker_t_washington.jpgFor all those who have the opportunity of going to school and are procrastinating then read the story of Booker T Washington. Imagine having to walk 200 miles to get an education! His life should inspire us to forget about the minor irritations and really get focused on making more of our lives!

(1856-1915) - Lecturer, Civil Rights/Human Rights Activist, Educational Administrator, Professor, Organization Executive/Founder, Author/Poet.

Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hale's Ford, Virginia, reportedly on April 5, 1856. After emancipation, his family was so poverty stricken that he worked in salt furnaces and coal mines beginning at age nine. Always an intelligent and curious child, he yearned for an education and was frustrated when he could not receive good schooling locally. When he was 16 his parents allowed him to quit work to go to school. They had no money to help him, so he walked 200 miles to attend the Hampton Institute in Virginia and paid his tuition and board there by working as the janitor.





Garrett Morgan – inventor extraordinaire

Webmin
7 Comments

GarrettMorgan.jpgMost people hearing the name Garrett Morgan can associate it with he being the man who invented the traffic light – but his work goes far beyond that. He also designed the first gas mask for use by firefighters, too.

Garrett Augustus Morgan was born on March 4, 1877 in Paris, Kentucky. He was the seventh of eleven children, and he spent his childhood working on their farm and attending elementary school.

At the age of 14 Garrett Morgan moved to Cincinnati, Ohio and hired a tutor so he could continue his English grammar studies. Garrett moved again in 1895, this time to Cleveland, Ohio and went to work for a clothing manufacturer as a repairman for the sewing machines. He did such a good job that news of his proficiency and experimentation spread quickly around town, and many job offers came pouring in.

In 1909, he had already opened his own tailoring shop when he came upon an interesting situation that led to the first of his famous inventions. Garrett noticed that the needles moved so fast through the wool fabrics, that the friction often caused them to scorch the fabric. He decided to try to come up with a liquid to polish the needles and reduce the friction. One day, when his wife called him for dinner, he wiped the liquid from his hands onto a pony-fur cloth to clean them. When he returned after dinner, he noticed that the fibers were standing up straight now. He thought that the liquid must have straightened them. He decided to test this theory by applying the liquid to the fur of his neighbor's dog, which was an Airedale.





Harriet Tubman – The Black Moses of her people

Webmin
5 Comments

harriet_tubman.jpgMartin Luther King, Malcolm X and others have dominated when it comes to imparting the achievements of blacks...but not enough is sung about Araminta Ross aka Harriet Tubman. Many often refer to her as 'the Moses of her people.' Get familiar with her inspiring story.

Born around 1820 in Bucktown, Maryland. Reared in slavery, she married a free black, John Tubman, in 1844. He opposed her plans to flee north, so she escaped alone via the Underground Railroad in 1849, and over the next decade she led nearly 300 Maryland slaves to safety, including several siblings and her elderly parents.

Harriet was a deeply devoutly religious woman and a believer in decisive action. She helped John Brown organize his 1859 raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia, but was prevented by illness from accompanying him. During the Civil War she repeatedly went behind enemy lines to spy for the Union, and recruit slaves to fight in the army.

In her later years, living in Auburn, New York, she helped support relatives and other former slaves, and raised money for freedmen's schools and a home for elderly blacks.

While Harriet Tubman remains one of history's best-known African Americans, until recently there have been few biographies of her written for adults. Because her life is inspiring, there are appropriately many children's stories about Tubman, but these tend to stress her early life, her own escape from slavery, and her work with the Underground Railroad. Less well known and neglected by many historians are her Civil War service and her activities in the nearly 50 years she lived after the Civil War ended. In this article, you'll find details about Harriet Tubman's life in slavery and her work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, but you'll also find information about Tubman's later and less-known work and life.





THE HISTORY OF VALENTINE'S DAY

Webmin
18 Comments

red-cupid.jpgValentine's Day started in the time of the Roman Empire. In ancient Rome, February 14th was a holiday to honor Juno. Juno was the Queen of the Roman Gods and Goddesses. The Romans also knew her as the Goddess of women and marriage. The following day, February 15th, began the Feast of Lupercalia.

The lives of young boys and girls were strictly separate. However, one of the customs of the young people was name drawing. On the eve of the festival of Lupercalia, the names of Roman girls were written on slips of paper and placed into jars. Each young man would draw a girl's name from the jar and would then be partners for the duration of the festival with the girl whom he chose. Sometimes the pairing of the children lasted an entire year, and often, they would fall in love and would later marry.

Under the rule of Emperor Claudius II, Rome was involved in many bloody and unpopular campaigns. Claudius the Cruel was having a difficult time getting soldiers to join his military leagues. He believed that the reason was that Roman men did not want to leave their loves or families. As a result, Claudius canceled all marriages and engagements in Rome.





Bob Marley – The man and his music

Webmin
11 Comments

By: Kemesha Bolton

BOBMARLEY.jpgIn highlighting the legend that has surpassed all expectation and given us all a sense of who we are; we celebrate his birth, music and his death on this day his Earthstrong.


HIS BIRTH

There was no event which took place during the early hours of the morning in rural St. Ann, Jamaica when newly wed, nineteen year old Cedella Malcolm-Marley gave birth to her first child.

The 'moon faced' Cedella suffered greatly from morning sickness. When she went into labour on Sunday evening, she was taken to the house of her father, Omeriah Malcolm. She remained in labour through all of Monday; then at 2:30 the following morning Robert Nesta was finally delivered: a fawn colored boy with nose of his father Captain Norval Sinclair Marley.

Just after sunrise the after birth was wrapped carefully in a page from the Gleaner that contained a story describing the arrest in Kingston the day before of a young rude boy who had stolen 35 pounds from a Chinaman. The Hooligans alias was Pearl Harbor.

The after birth was buried at the foot of a young mango sapling that would from that day forth be Nesta's 'frenly tree', it would grow as tall and as strong as he wished it to, it's health and height reflecting his care; it would bend with the passage of time in the same direction as its cultivator.





In the beginning was Reggae!

Webmin
4 Comments

reggae ramp halspark.jpgThe word "reggae" was coined around 1960 in Jamaica to identify a "ragged" style of dance music, that still had its roots in New Orleans rhythm'n'blues.

However, reggae soon acquired the lament-like style of chanting and emphasized the syncopated beat. It also made explicit the relationship with the underworld of the "Rastafarians" (adepts of a millenary African faith, revived Marcus Garvey who advocated a mass emigration back to Africa), both in the lyrics and in the appropriation of the African nyah-bingi drumming style (a style that mimicks the heartbeat with its pattern of "thump-thump, pause, thump-thump").

Compared with rock music, reggae music basically inverted the role of bass and guitar: the former was the lead, the latter beat the typical hiccupping pattern. The paradox of reggae, of course, is that this music "unique to Jamaica" is actually not Jamaican at all, having its foundations in the USA and Africa.





Influences of Blacks on the world

Webmin
4 Comments

carver_george1.jpgAs we celebrate black history month you can't help but reflect on the great contributions blacks made in making life better for all.

YardFlex in celebration of Black History Month will be featuring some outstanding black luminaries throughout the month.

We start off with George Washington Carver one of the most famous black inventor in history.

His contributions to the world in the areas of agriculture have influenced the economy and provided us with great products ranging from peanut butter to colors for our clothing.

George Washington Carver was born on July 12, 1864 in Diamond Grove, Missouri. He was a sickly child who would remain that way for the majority of his childhood years. He and his mother lived on a farm owned by Moses and Susan Carver, when they were kidnapped during a raid one night. Days later, neighbors found George and returned him to the Carvers, but now he had contracted whooping cough. His mother was nowhere to be found, so the Carver family raised him as their own.

Because of his poor health, George Washington Carver was not able to help out by working in the fields, but he did have a great interest in plants, and even planted his own garden in the woods near their farm. He produced medicines for his family and was soon given the nicknamed, 'The Plant Doctor.'

George was unable to get into any schools until he was 12, due to his race. To get into first formal school, he had to move to Newton County, Missouri and leave his adoptive parents behind, because there were no black schools any closer. He worked on a farm to earn money for his education in a one-room schoolhouse. Shortly afterward, he moved with another family to Fort Scott, Kansas.

When it was time to move on and continue his education at the University level, George Washington Carver again ran into resistance because of the color of his skin. After being denied entrance into Highland University, he was accepted into Simpson College in Iowa in the year 1890. George was very talented in Art, and earned great respect for that, but his passion was in Science and Agriculture. He transferred to the Iowa Agricultural College, which is now known as Iowa State University, and graduated in 1894. Upon graduation, Carver was offered a position on the faculty and allowed great freedom in the school's greenhouses to pursue his agricultural work. He was the first African American to be offered a faculty position at that College.

In 1896, George Washington Carver received his Master's Degree in Agriculture having co-authored a series of papers on the cures for fungus diseases. In 1897, he discovered two new fungi that were later named after him.

Booker T. Washington convinced George to come down to the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to serve as the Director of Agriculture in 1897.





Oh we miss the Israelite!

Webmin
3 Comments

music-dvd-a-dekker.jpgDesmond Dekker thrilled the world with his ska-laced songs and without a doubt when he died on May 25, 2006 he left a rich legacy of songs that can never be forgotten.

Desmond was the first musician who carried the music from his home Jamaica to the rest of the world. He is considered one of the ancestors of ska. YardFlex take time out to salute the man who made his contribution to the genre.

Desmond Dacres was born in 1942 in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of 19 he met the influential Leslie Kong and who would have supposed that by now a new legend was born? In 1963, the newly named Dekker released his first single, "Honor Your Father And Mother," which was also issued in the UK courtesy of Chris Blackwell's Island label. During the same period, Dekker teamed up with his backing group, the Aces. Together they enjoyed enormous success in Jamaica during the mid-late 60's with a formidable run of 20 number 1 hits to their credit.

The emergence of rocksready in the latter half of 1966 propelled his James Bond inspired "007 (Shanty Town)" into the UK charts the following year. Also the single presaged Dekker's emergence as an
internationally famous artist. 1969 proved the year of Dekker's greatest worldwide success. "Get up in the morning, slaving for bread, sir, so that every mouth can be fed", was a patois-sung opening line which entranced and confused pop listeners on both sides of the Atlantic. The intriguing "Israelites" was a club hit the previous year and by the spring of 1969 had become the first reggae song to top the UK charts ever!





Remembering Dennis Brown

Webmin
12 Comments

dennis_brown.jpgJuly 1, 1999 will be a day remembered by lovers of good reggae music...it's the day when one of the greatest Reggae crooners – Dennis Brown made his exit from the world.

At age 42, he was definitely a life cut short way too soon. Yet in that span he managed to leave the world a rich legacy of feel good songs that decades from now will still be hot.

In a career that spanned almost 4 decades, Dennis worked with many of reggae's top names, beginning with Coxsone Dodd at Studio One, going on to work with such artistes and producers as Winston (Niney) Holness, Joe Gibbs, Derrick Harriott, Herman Chin-Loy, Sidney Crooks, Prince Buster, Randy's, Phil Pratt and GG Ranglin. The list goes on with Clive Hunt and Willie Lindo, engineer Errol Thompson, Sly & Robbie, Gussie Clarke, Tad Dawkins, Trevor Bow, Bunny Lee and Delroy Wright.

Dennis Emanuel Brown was born on February 1, 1957 in Kingston, Jamaica. Regularly billed as "The Crown Prince Of Reggae', it was only Brown's self-effacing nature that denied him advancement to the office of king. Loved in reggae music like no other singer, Brown was regularly courted by the major record labels, and even enjoyed a couple of token chart hits in Britain. More to the point, he produced more reggae classics than just about anyone else. Beginning his career at the age of 9 as one of the Studio One label's many child stars, his first hit, "No Man Is An Island" (1969), found him singing in much the same style he was to use throughout his career, only with a far less croaky voice.

"If I Follow My Heart", another major hit at Studio One, was every bit as good. He spent the early 70s freelancing between studios, recording for Lloyd Daley, Impact, Joe Gibbs and Aquarius, before recording his third collection, "Super Reggae And Soul Hits," a mature, classic record, full of Derrick Harriott's soulful arrangements and Brown's rich tones. A move to Winston "Niney" Holness' label was no less profitable. The two albums he made there, "Just Dennis" and "Wolf & Leopards," were recorded three years apart but their seamless rootsy artistry made them clearly part of one body of work.

A long, fruitful liaison with Joe Gibbs and Errol Thompson resulted in a further series of classic albums, among them "Visions," "Joseph's Coat Of Many Colours," "Spellbound" and "Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow." While the rock critics were latching on to dub in the mid-70s, it was Brown who was drawing a mass audience almost unnoticed outside reggae's heartlands.





Ross Kemp looks at the gang violence in Kingston, Jamaica and examines the political history involved...





The Origins of Black History Month

Webmin
3 Comments

carter_g_woodson.jpgIn 1926, Negro History Week was established to honor the accomplishments of African Americans. Carter G. Woodson, a black historian known as the Father of Black History, as well as others proposed the observance. During the 1970s, the observance became known as Black History Week.

In 1976, Black History Month was established. Black History Month is observed each year in February. It coincides with the birthdays of the great black leader Frederick Douglass (February 14) and Abraham Lincoln (February 12).

The celebration is sponsored by the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History in Washington, DC, which Woodson founded in 1915.





selassie.jpgNational Geographic reported that in 1930, as the dawn cleared in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on November 2, it met everyone getting ready for the special historical event to take place that morning - The Coronation of The Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah.

Together with his Empress, His Imperial Majesty, Haile Selassie I spent the night before in prayer and devotion at the most high alter. During the morning chanting of praises resonated and dancing priests with pulsating drum rhythms joined in. Ancient Jewish rites which were in use at the time of King David, were re-lived right there before the ark of the covenant, the report stated. The Coptic Church in all its impressive might and splendor evoked biblical rituals that seemed to roll the centuries back.

As the time came for this coronation, which is the most important event in the Rastafarian Calendar today, His Imperial Majesty entered the ceremonial hall attired in white silk. He was escorted by aides and clergy and was preceded by waving incense burners.





Happy Heroes Day - Oct 15, 2007

Webmin
6 Comments

Jamaica celebrates yet another Heroes Day and in honour Yardflex pay tribute to the many who have laid the foundation that we can now enjoy true freedom. To the many unsung heroes whose work will not make it in the history books, to those who are still working behind the scenes making a difference in their own way.

Yardflex now take a brief look at our seven national heroes...they may be gone, but their work will be ringing out in the ages to come.

Garvey1.jpgMarcus Garvey
Marcus Mosiah Garvey stands out in history as one who was greatly committed to the concept of the Emancipation of minds. He sought the unification of all Blacks through the establishment of the United Negro Improvement Association and spoke out against economic exploitation and cultural denigration.

Jamaica's first national hero was born in Saint Ann's Bay on August17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper "The Watchman".
During his career Marcus Garvey traveled extensively throughout many countries observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects; protest against racial discrimination and cultural activities.

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country. He spent many years in the United States pursuing his goal of Black Unification. However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity forming the People's Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections. The world of the thirties was not ready for Marcus Garvey’s progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.





Enkutatash (New Year) September 8, 2007

Webmin
4 Comments

sis carol.jpglivity ras poet.jpg
tarrus riley livity1.jpg
The Ethiopian New Year falls in September at the end of the big rains. The highlands turn to gold as the Meskel daisies burst out in all their splendor. Ethiopian children clad in brand new clothes dance through the villages giving bouquets of flowers and painted pictures to each household. September 11th is both New Year's Day and the Feast of St. John the Baptist.

The day is called Enkutatash meaning the "gift of jewels." When the famous Queen of Sheba returned from her expensive jaunt to visit King Solomon in Jerusalem, her chiefs welcomed her back by replenishing her treasury with enku or jewels. The spring festival has been celebrated since these early times and as the rains come to their abrupt end, dancing and singing can be heard at every village in the green countryside. After dark on New Year's Eve people light fires outside their houses.





Ethiopia.gifPrime Minister Meles Zenawi.jpg
On September 11, 2007 at midnight in Ethiopia, the New Year and New Millennium celebrations began amid lavish gatherings, religious zeal and positive messages from the country’s troubled government. Ethiopia and Ethiopians throughout the world marked this day with immense enthusiasm and will continue to celebrate for days to come.

In the 6th Century, the rest of the Christian world made revisions in its estimate of the date of Christ’s birth - but Ethiopia kept the old date, which means that 7 years after the rest of the world, the country is marking the start of the year 2000.

For Rastafarians worldwide, recognizing and aligning with the calendar of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Ethiopia (a unique slightly modified Julian calendar) has been a part of their lifestyle and today Rastas everywhere have begun to commemorate the beginning of the year 2000.





Caribbean Day Parade 2007 Largest in History

Webmin
7 Comments

parade.jpgparade 2.jpg
Eastern Parkway in Brookly, New York was the scene of great revelry as another Caribbean Day Parade was held. The Labour Day weekend has historically been a day of heavy feting for national of the Caribbean regions and their friends. Most prominent at the annual West Indian Caribbean day parade were Haitians and Trinidadians who displayed a joint float promoting their Christian faith. The float expressed the sentiments of many in attendance with its prophetic message - "Start to pray today, because you may not be here tomorrow."

There were an estimated one million people in attendance at the parade. Despite the prayer message displayed on the float, at least one person's prayers went unanswered as he became the lone reported casualty of the day. At around 4:00 p.m., gunshots rang out in excess at Troy Avenue, which left one 26 year-old man injured with two gun shots to his leg. The injuries are considered non-life threatening.





The Marcus Garvey Story

Webmin
5 Comments