Reggae Sumfest 2018

Time for women to take a stand


By: Rootz girl

Rasta-Girl-Posters.jpg'Teck buddy gal', 'skettel’, 'bitch', 'hoes'... well the list of derogatory adjectives could go on and on that have been used by hip hop and dancehall artistes alike to refer to women in the dirt that's being called songs.

One would think that any self-respecting woman listening to these songs would feel disgust and great indignation coming to the fore as the words penetrate and then do the only acceptable thing – turn off the radio or get rend of the offending item.

But here is the shocker, there are actually women out there who find nothing wrong with the garbage being spewed out by these artistes, instead they embrace both artistes and the nonsense that are being passed off as songs.

To make matters even worse, they war with each other over the artistes that have shown their disrespect for them repeatedly in the songs they choose to do.

Am I missing the whole picture here? Is there no value placed on us women anymore? Has material things and basking in the limelight allow us as women to lose all sense of moral values, decency and some kind of pride that would see us demanding even a semblance of respect for ourselves?

This truth was brought home to me in no uncertain terms, as I objected to a particular song by Vybz Kartel. I thought the lyrics was crude and showed no respect to women. My greatest opponent then was another female, one who claimed the song "a teck life" and "him not talking about her"! There goes the theory of unity being strength!

If you are wondering why women are not getting the kind of respect they deserve – the answer is simple – they have stopped demanding it!

Instead of booing good cultural artistes or buying out the argument between Beenie Man and, Bounty and D'Angel, pick a good cause to let your loud voices be heard – boo for your self-respect.

Reggae Sumfest 2018


Reggae Sumfest 2018