Sting 2006 - Early performers - Queen Paula shines

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Ackee and Saltfish, the Japanese deejay duo, offered important culinary tips with the line, 'haffi get the nookie, but me nah taste'. Bugle had the firepower in terms of patrons setting off rockets to herald his arrival, but the crowd soon 'bugled' its disapproval of him and he was forced to exit stage right. Watching Martina perform was like watching a bucket of cement harden on a lazy Sunday afternoon, while Stacious earned a big forward with an obscure reference to Beenie Man's wedding band. The Nah Switch crew from Olympic Way, heroes of the Moneygram TV ads, were amusing at best, while Taru asserted that 'police and soldiers get the most gun' to a smattering of applause.

Bescenta sparkled with his hit, 'The World is in Trouble' and wowed the audience with his crisp clear vocals. A subdued Deva Brat, probably acting on strict orders not to diss I-d-d-d-onia, worked hard to elicit a forward, but other than a wisecrack to a girl that he would "soon sort out her crotches morning', he failed to spark the slumbering crowd. AT 11:40 p.m., Nanko, doing his second stint at Sting 2006, turned up to register a pleasant surprise for the audience, showing that he has grown in stature and confidence as an entertainer. The Downsound Recording artiste rocked the crowd with his monster hit, 'Lucky You' and then followed up with an even bigger ovation for his present top ten hit, 'Loco Amore', the crowd singing along with the first line: '...maybe baby girl I should take you to Bahamas...'

Queen Paula introduced the first bit of raw passa passa into the night's proceedings when she made offcolour remarks regarding the size, depth and width of deejay Spiceโ€™s sexual cavities. Her exacts words were "Spice p---y big like We are the World'.

She revealed to the concert that Spice had threatened her with a phone call that she reported began "hey gal, hope yu nah go ah Sting go call up mi name. After that, mi get another phone call say if yu call Spice name, yu ah go dead."

Paula then told the Sting audience, 'nobody caan threaten me', and deejayed 'tell a dutty gal nuh start nuh war, Paula no buss water gun', and asked Laing: 'yu nuh have nutten roun de fi mi kill?'.

After that descent into vulgarity, Etana was a welcome change at midnight ushering in feel-good Cinderella vibes with 'Killing the Yutes Dem Slowly', a nod to Roberta Flack's 'Killing Them Softly'. But this Cinderella had bite on Sting night because her sharp social commentary offered on 'Wrong Address' highlighted the social struggles of the average ghetto person in finding employment in Jamaica's deeply stratified society.

Natasha from Denmark worked hard but failed to make an impact while DJ Face was a ho-hum yawn, to put it kindly. The arrival of Natural Bridges recording artiste Mr. Peppa got an immediate response from the crowd and his 'Gangsta Guerilla' hit earned him a big forward. He introduced G Maffiah, who although he has stage presence and charisma, failed to move the audience with his single, 'Bag a Noise'. Afterwards, Mr. Peppa showed off his polished banter in between songs and introduced his biggest hit to date, 'Hypocrite a Talk' to an enthusiastic crowd.

After Mr. Peppa's exit, Danielle, wearing a tight red outfit that gripped her ample assets like a second skin, amused with her 'pretty pink pepper light' descriptions of her genitalia, very suggestive given her choice of attire that night. She however was hampered by the lame play of the band on the stand which insisted on playing the rhythms without leads or phrases, leaving the artistes essentially without the vibes to deliver their material.

Still, Warrior King was in awesome form belting out hits โ€˜Never Go Where the Pagans Goโ€™ and 'Virtuous Woman' before making way for Little Hero to reminisce about 'Down in the Ghetto', to yearn for 'King Solomon's World' before finally admitting 'I Don't Know What to Do'.

Then the stage was set for the arrival of the Gargamel, Buju Banton, who hit the stage at about 12:45 a.m., one hour later than the advertised start of his set.

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